Archive | Building consents

Home consents up 8% for year, non-residential forging ahead

Consents for new homes nationally in June dropped 18% from a 14-year spike in May, but were up 9.1% compared to June last year.

The total value of all consents issued in the year to June rose 10.7% to $21.5 billion.

Home consents for the June year were 7.9% ahead of the previous year at 32,860, and lifted the rolling annual tally by 132 from May.

The value of all new residential consents, including additions & alterations, rose just over 11% for the month & the year, to $1.17 billion for the month and $12.8 billion for the year.

Standalone homes’ share of new consents fell 4 percentage points for the month to 62%, 5 points for the year to 64.4%.

The national consent numbers for new homes in June and the year to June, compared to June last year, and the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months:

Total consents for new homes:  2792 (2560 in June 2017, 3407 in May 2018), up 9.1%; 32,860 (30,453), up 7.9%
Total values for new homes, plus alterations & additions: $1.17 billion ($1.05 billion), up 11.2%; $14.2 billion ($12.8 billion), up 11.1%
Standalone homes:  1730 (1691), up 2.3%; 21,176 (21,090), up 0.4%
Apartments: 323 (268), up 20.5%; 3922 (2913), up 34.6%
Retirement village units: 144 (222), down 35.1%; 2002 (1651), up 21.3%
Suburban townhouses & flats: 595 (379), up 57%; 5760 (4799), up 20%
Standalone share of consents:  62% for the month (66%); 64.4% for the year (69.3%).

In Auckland – Manukau up 150%, Howick up 116%

The spread of new consents around the Auckland region has varied considerably over the last 12 months – down at the rural extremities, big jumps in parts of South Auckland, smaller rises in parts of the isthmus.

A quick count of the shifts: Rodney down 20%; in the city centre & islands ward of Waitemata & Gulf up 35%; down 3% in the ward with the biggest volume, Albany; up 56% in Orakei; up 67% in Maungakiekie-Tamaki; up 116% in Howick; up 150% in Manukau; up 34% in Manurewa & Papakura; down 25% in Franklin.

Auckland residential consents, for June & year to June compared to June last year and the previous 12 months:

Region: 1001 (906 in June 2017, 1530 in May 2018), up 10.5% from last June; 12,369 (10,364), up 19.3%
Rodney: 67 (105), 795 (992)
Albany: 210 (247), 2506 (2585)
North Shore: 24 (45), 721 (496)
Waitakere: 79 (45), 662 (606)
Waitemata & Gulf: 15 (61), 1408 (1040)
Whau: 83 (91), 434 (378)
Albert-Eden-Roskill: 107 (160), 822 (841)
Orakei: 21 (12), 386 (248)
Maungakiekie-Tamaki: 70 (20), 773 (464)
Howick: 98 (32), 847 (393)
Manukau: 68 (23), 1002 (401)
Manurewa-Papakura: 85 (19), 1307 (973)
Franklin: 74 (46), 706 (947)

The non-residential sectors, and the total

The total value of all consents issued in the year to June was $21.5 billion, up 10.7% from $19.4 billion in the previous 12 months.

After 2 $2 billion months this year (March & May), total consents were comparatively low at $1.74 billion, but that was 13.1% above June last year.

Consents for non-residential buildings were up 17.5% for the month at $530 million ($451 million), and up 10.3% over 12 months to $6.9 billion ($6.2 billion).

In non-residential sectors, the value of consents for hotels, motels & other short-term accommodation has slipped 33% in the last 12 months to $328 million after rising by 216% to $490 million in the previous 12 months. The consent value in that sector in June rose 103% to $50 million.

Consents for shops, restaurants & bars fell 23% in the year to June 2017, from $904 million to $698 million, but have regained most of that ground in the latest 12 months, rising 43% to $996 million.

Industrial building consents rose 43% in the year to June 2017 to $577 million, and another 37% in the last 12 months to $792 million.

The 2 biggest non-residential categories are education and a combination of offices, administration & public transport. Consents for education buildings have topped $1 billion/year for 3 years after jumping from $776 million to $1.24 billion in 2016. The sector slipped to $1.1 billion last year but has picked up to $1.16 billion in the last 12 months, a 5.2% rise.

Consents in the office sector have exceeded $1 billion/year for 5 years after rising from $797 million to $1.035 billion in 2014. They reached $1.25 billion in 2017 but have fallen 13.1% in the last 12 months to $1.09 billion.

Attribution: Stats NZ tables & release.

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15-year high for Auckland home consents

Consents for new homes in Auckland hit a 15-year high of 1530 in May. It was the 6th time in 12 months that consents had topped 1000.

In October 2002, 1945 consents for new homes were issued in Auckland, including 1206 apartments.

The 3407 consents for new homes issued nationally in May were the highest number since the 3447 in June 2004.

Nationally, consents were up 6.5% over the last 12 months to 32,628. In Auckland, the 12,274 consents for the year were up 18%.

Standalone houses remained the biggest contributor, but with a declining market share.

Standalones represented 77.6% of new consents in May 2016, falling to 73% last May and to 63.6% this May. On an annual basis, standalones fell from 72.1% in the year to May 2016 to 69.4% in 2017 and 64.8% in the latest 12 months.

The national consent numbers for May and the year to May, compared to May last year, and the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months:

Total consents for new homes: 3407 (2794), 32,628 (30,645)
Total values for new homes: $1.383 billion ($1.229 billion); $14.085 billion ($12.81  billion)
Standalone homes: 2167 (2039); 21,137 (21,262)
Apartments: 454 (123); 3867 (2881)
Retirement village units: 255 (137); 2080 (1718)
Suburban townhouses & flats: 531 (495); 5544 (4784)
Standalone share of consents:  63.6% for the month (73%); 64.8% (69.4%).

Auckland residential consents, for May & year to May compared to May last year and the previous 12 months:

Region: 1530 (885), 12,274 (10,379)
Rodney: 82 (159), 833 (965)
Albany: 283 (208), 2543 (2549)
North Shore: 37 (42), 742 (484)
Waitakere:  73 (53), 628 (626)
Waitemata & Gulf: 318 (9), 1454 (1093)
Whau: 54 (13), 442 (339)
Albert-Eden-Roskill: 147 (94), 875(731)
Orakei: 92 (5), 377 (280)
Maungakiekie-Tamaki: 85 (83), 723 (468)
Howick: 78 (33), 781 (401)
Manukau: 60 (33), 957(397)
Manurewa-Papakura: 145 (65), 1241 (1065)
Franklin: 76 (88), 678 (944)

Total construction

Over all sectors, the value of all consents has been rising by $2 billion/year since New Zealand edged out of the global financial crisis in 2013.

In the 12 months to May 2013, consents for all construction were worth $11.2 billion. In the latest 12 months they were worth $21.3 billion, up 8% from $19.7 billion in the year to May 2017.

Consents for non-residential construction rose 8.7% in May to $657 million ($605 million), and 4.2% for the year to $6.8 billion ($6.5 billion).

Attribution: Statistics NZ.

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Decision Monday on how to meet building consent flows

Auckland Council’s strategic procurement committee will decide tomorrow (noon Monday) whether to renew its overflow delivery model for building consent services.

The item is listed in the committee’s open agenda but the main discussion will be confidential.

The question for the council is how to provide an efficient service at peak times without employing its own staff to cover those peaks.

The council’s head of physical works & technical services procurement, Peter Cunningham, says in his meeting report: “Building consent services are currently provided through a combination of inhouse delivery, an overflow delivery model that operates across the Auckland region and a legacy outsourced provider model that operates exclusively in Manukau.

“In the central region, in addition to the overflow model there is also an agency provider to manage building consenting volumes.”

The current contracts expire on 30 June.

In further explanation, Mr Cunningham says: “The preferred regional service delivery model for building consents is one where third-party suppliers are used to process consents and inspect buildings that council staff do not have the capacity to process, eg, an overflow delivery model.  In an overflow model, the suppliers would act as an agent of Auckland Council.

“Due to restraint on additional staff and to manage risk of over-capacity, the overflow model is considered an essential component to ensure the delivery of an efficient, quality, timely building consenting service.

“The overflow model is considered a more feasible alternative to delivering the full service inhouse, as it provides flexibility during seasonal peaks & troughs in building consent volumes.”

Also listed in both the open & confidential sections of the agenda are:

  • an update on the 48 council projects with a budget over $5 million, and
  • the council’s vertical construction procurement category strategy
  • an update on the Westgate town centre integrated library & community centre.

Web notification issues

Through Auckland Council’s changes to its website it’s been hard at times to track the whereabouts of information such as resource consent application hearings and submissions on them.

The latest trick I’ve stumbled upon under submissions is submission documents with an opening date for submissions – but no closing date.

I’m writing this on Sunday, so ringing the council to check today would be pointless.

Similarly, the Eden Park Trust’s application for resource consent for a concert at Eden Park stadium on the evening of Waitangi Day (6 February) next year has the submissions period opening on Wednesday, no closing date.

The closing date will very likely appear on the website once the opening date has passed. But tell me, which would you, as a submitter, find the more useful?

Links:
Strategic procurement committee, Monday 11 June at noon, 135 Albert St
11, Update on capital projects over $5 million (addressed further in confidential agenda)
12, Procurement of building consents overflow services (decisions to be made in confidential agenda)
13, Status update: Westgate multipurpose facility (integrated library & community centre) construction (addressed further in confidential agenda)
14, Vertical construction procurement category strategy (addressed further in confidential agenda)

Attribution: Council committee agenda.

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Construction slowing – but still on growth track

Figures out from Statistics NZ on Wednesday on construction activity indicate slowdowns – but still growth – across all sectors, and specifically residential.

But an overall call on the direction of construction activity – residential & other, nationally & in Auckland, quarterly & annually – proves impossible. For starters, Statistics NZ doesn’t run actual residential figures for Auckland, just seasonally adjusted & trend, which longtime readers of these pages know I steer clear of.

Auckland construction (all sectors) jumped almost 15% from the March quarter to June last year, then plateaued for 3 quarters.

For the national picture of all construction sectors, looking back 4 years shows leaps in 2 years, lower growth in 2.

Residentially, the March quarter was the quietest since September 2015 but still showed growth.

The detail

Total building work put in place, March quarter: $5.28 billion ($5.6 billion & $5.5 billion in the previous 2 quarters, $5.16 billion in the March 2017 quarter)
Quarterly percentage shifts: Up 7.0% in the March quarter after 3 quarters of lower gains, a 10.9% rise in the March 2017 quarter and above-20% increases in the 3 quarters before that
Total all buildings for the March year: $21.57 billion, up $1.2 billion (5.9%) after leaps, since the $13.15 billion in the March 2014 year, of $2.5 billion (19.1%), $1.5 billion (9.5%) & $3.2 billion (18.7%)

The residential figures nationally, March quarter:

New: $2.92 billion ($2.71 billion in the March 2017 quarter), up 7.6% from the March 2017 quarter, the smallest quarterly increase since September 2015; increases in the last 3 quarters of 2016 were in the range of 24-28%, slipping to 14.8% in the March 2017 quarter
Alterations & additions: $568 million ($542 million in the March 2017 quarter), up 4.9%; this segment of the residential market has put $5-600 million of work in place in 9 of the last 10 quarters
Total residential: $3.49 billion ($3.25 billion), up 7.2%, the smallest quarterly rise over the last 3 years

The residential figures nationally, March year:

New: $11.78 billion ($10.82 billion), up 8.9% after a 22% rise the previous year
Alterations & additions: $2.31 billion ($2.23 billion), up 3.8% after a 12.9% rise the previous year
Total residential: $14.09 billion ($13.04 billion), up 8.1% after double-digit annual rises in the previous 4 years, including 21.1% in the March 2017 year & 26% in the March 2014 year

Auckland & Canterbury drive construction activity

Construction statistics manager Melissa McKenzie said Auckland & Canterbury accounted for $3 billion (56%) of the national value of total building activity in the March quarter: “Total
building work in Auckland was about $2 billion/quarter for the last year, while values in Canterbury were down from post-earthquake highs. However, these values were boosted by higher construction costs.”

In Auckland, she said, the value of residential building work had been growing strongly, with the March 2018 quarter value of $1.39 billion almost double that in the March 2014 quarter. Meanwhile, non-residential building work has shown moderate growth. Offices, education & accommodation buildings accounted for over half of Auckland’s $632 million total non-residential building work in the March 2018 quarter.

In Canterbury, the value of building work in the latest quarter was $941 million – the lowest quarterly value since the March 2014 quarter: “Residential building activity value in Canterbury has been generally falling since the March 2015 quarter. Non-residential building activity has been variable, but reached $440 million in the March 2018 quarter. The latest value was boosted by several projects on social, cultural & religious buildings.”

Auckland:
All buildings, March quarter: $2.02 billion (up 14.8% from $1.76 billion in the March 2017 quarter; the last 3 quarters have all been just over $2 billion)

Links:
Statistics NZ, 2 February 2018: Conferences, culture, and tourism boost consents
Statistics NZ, 31 July 2017: More hotels on the way

Attribution: Statistics NZ tables & release.

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Consents for new homes hit 14-year high of 32,000

Consents for new homes were up 30% in April compared to April last year, and the total for 12 months exceeded 32,000 for the first time since 2004.

Statistics NZ released the figures on Wednesday.

The national consent numbers for April & the year to April (previous April & year in brackets):
Total consents for new homes: 2729 (2106), up 29.6%; 32,015 (30,371), up %
Total values (including alterations & additions) & floor areas for new homes: month – $1.122 billion ($921 million), up 21.9%; 435,000m² (378,000m²), up 15.2%; year – $13.931 billion ($12.658 billion), up 10.1%; 5.555 million m² (5.462 million m²), up1.7%
Standalone homes: 1614 (1487), up 8.5%; 21,009 (21,179), down 0.8%
Apartments: 358 (228), up 57%; 3536 (2874), up 23%
Retirement village units: 191 (46), up 315%; 1962 (1702), up 15.3%
Suburban townhouses & flats: 566 (345), up 64%; 5508 (4616), up 19.3%
*Total values include additions & alterations, but floor areas don’t.

Consents for both the month & the year rose in 10 Auckland wards and fell in 3 (6 differing by small margins).

Around Auckland by ward, this April & last, and the April 2018 year & previous 12 months:

Region: 1163 (726), 11,629 (10,226)
Rodney: 45 (81), 910 (882)
Albany: 240 (125), 2468 (2508)
North Shore: 202 (25), 747 (494)
Waitakere: 73 (25), 608 (617)
Waitemata & Gulf: 5 (166), 1145 (1104)
Whau: 91 (51), 401 (343)
Albert-Eden-Roskill: 13 (25), 822 (674)
Orakei: 65 (4), 290 (283)
Maungakiekie-Tamaki: 55 (31), 721 (417)
Howick: 79 (28), 736 (452)
Manukau: 81 (32), 930 (394)
Manurewa-Papakura: 142 (73), 1161 (1106)
Franklin: 72 (60), 690 (952)

Attribution: Statistics NZ tables & release.

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Updated: Houses’ share of consents falls further as overall momentum slows

Published & updated twice 1 May 2018

The annual rate of building consents for new homes topped 31,000 last November, reaching 31,123, and in the following 4 months has risen by just 269.

After double-digit percentage rises over the previous 5 years, the rise in the last 12 months was only 2.5%.

The share of standalone houses for the last 12 months was 66.5%, down from 67.4% in the year to February, 70% in the year to March 2017.

Apartments and suburban townhouses & flats were well up for the year, by 27.5% for apartments and 14.8% for the townhouse category, but the retirement village sector’s production rate remains well below the last 3 years’ figures

Consents in Auckland were up for the month, from 942 a year ago to 1082, but were up by only 993 (9.7%) for the 12 months, to 11,192.

The Auckland consents comprised 492 standalone houses, 361 apartments, 221 suburban units & 8 retirement village units. Statistics NZ construction statistics manager Melissa McKenzie said three-quarters of the apartments were in 3 projects.

The national consent numbers for March & the year to March (previous March & year in brackets):
Total consents for new homes: 2926 (2779), up 5.3%; 31,392 (30,626), up 2.5%
Total values & floor areas for new homes: month – $1.257 billion ($1.199 billion), up 4.9%; 483,000m² (491,000m²), down 1.7%; year – $13.73 billion ($12.685 billion), up 8.2%; 5.498 million m² (5.523 million m²), up 4.9%
Standalone homes: 1753 (1923), down 8.8%; 20,882 (21,434), down 2.6%
Apartments: 492 (252), up 95.2%; 3406 (2671), up 27.5%
Retirement village units: 64 (197), down 67.5%; 1817 (1915), down 5.1%
Suburban townhouses & flats: 617 (407), up 51.6%; 5287 (4606), up 14.8%
*Total values include additions & alterations, but floor areas don’t.

Around Auckland by ward, this March & last, and the March 2017 year & previous 12 months:

Region: 1082 (942), 11,192 (10,199)
Rodney: 53 (122), 946 (890)
Albany: 195 (227), 2353 (2518)
North Shore: 43 (53), 570 (486)
Waitakere: 44 (55), 560 (652)
Waitemata & Gulf: 121 (116), 1306 (961)
Whau: 35 (40), 361 (310)
Albert-Eden-Roskill: 71 (37), 834 (670)
Orakei: 19 (12), 229 (306)
Maungakiekie-Tamaki: 31 (26), 697 (412)
Howick: 61 (24), 685 (495)
Manukau: 197 (38), 881 (394)
Manurewa-Papakura: 162 (114), 1092 (1108)
Franklin: 50 (78), 678 (997)

All construction for March compared to March 2017, and the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months:
Total: $2.003 billion ($2.077 billion), down 3.6%; $20.78 billion ($19.529 billion), up 6.4%
Non-residential: $714 million ($837 million), down 14.7%; $6.633 billion ($6.463 billion), up 2.6%

Attribution: Statistics NZ.

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Quiet February for consents, standalone market share slides, Auckland share up

Consents for new homes issued in February fell by 6 from February last year, from 2418 to 2412. The tally for 12 months rose by just 83 to 31,245 (30,162).

For the year, consents for standalone homes fell 1.3% behind the previous 12 months, apartments jumped 29.2%, suburban townhouses & flats 12% and retirement village units 5.3%.

The further shift toward intensification and the growth in Auckland’s share of consents have reduced the standalone share of new housing consents nationally to 67.4% in the February year. Overall floor area was up marginally (0.6%) but the value of proposed new homes (plus additions & alterations) rose 9.3%.

Auckland’s share of consents for 12 months rose from 33.3% in the February 2017 year to 35.4%.

Consents were down 1-2% on Auckland’s borders, north & south, continued to decline in Canterbury and jumped in the Bay of Plenty & Wellington.

The overall picture is of a static residential construction market that covers the net inflow of migrants but not total population growth, and continues the intensification trend which should speed up as Aucklanders take advantage of the new rules for suburbia under the region’s unitary plan.

The figures released by Statistics NZ yesterday show residential consents in Auckland were down by 21 for February to 779 (800) and 8 short of the tally in February 2016. For the year, Auckland consents have advanced by 10% to 11,052 (10,045) after rising 5.6% the previous year.

The total value of residential consents nationally in February rose 5.2% from a year ago to $1.12 billion ($1.06 billion). For the year, the increase was 9.3% to $13.67 billion ($12.5 billion), down from 14%-plus increases in the previous 2 years & 27%-plus in 2013 & 2014.

The national residential consent numbers for February & the February 2018 year (previous February & year in brackets):
Total consents for new homes: 2412 (2418), 31,245 (30,162)
Total values & floor areas for new homes: $963 million ($912 million), up 5.6%; 434,000m² (450,000m²), down 3.5%; $13.671 billion ($12.507 billion), up 9.3%; 5.506 million m² (5.475 million m²), up 0.6%
Standalone homes: 1664 (1761), down 5.5%; 21,052 (21,326), down 1.3%

Standalones’ share of annual consents: 67.4% (70.7%)
Apartments: 133 (225), down 40.9%; 3166 (2451) up 29.2%
Retirement village units: 107 (59), up 81.4%; 1950 (1852), up 5.3%
Suburban townhouses & flats: 508 (373), up 36.2%; 5077 (4533), up 12%

Around Auckland by ward, this February & last, and the February 2017 year & previous 12 months:

Region: 779 (800), 11,052 (10,045) – 35.6% of annual total
Rodney: 57 (87), 1015 (868)
Albany: 196 (196), 2385 (2469)
North Shore: 30 (72), 580 (508)
Waitakere: 49 (44), 571 (648)
Waitemata & Gulf: 11 (73), 1301 (859)
Whau: 20 (2), 366 (287)
Albert-Eden-Roskill: 117 (33), 800 (673)
Orakei: 22 (71), 222 (303)
Maungakiekie-Tamaki: 31 (6), 692 (408)
Howick: 69 (51), 648 (520)
Manukau: 64 (14), 722 404)
Manurewa-Papakura: 76 (75), 1044 (1087)
Franklin: 37 (76), 706 (1011)

Residential consents this February & last, and the February 2017 year & previous 12 months, in a selection of provinces:

Northland: 115 (131), 1237 (1261), down 1.9%
Waikato: 264 (294), 3469 (3512), down 1.2%
Bay of Plenty: 166 (226), 2630 (2055), up 28%
Wellington: 239 (133), 2432 (1711), up 42.1%
Canterbury: 375 (361), 4962 (6319), down 21.5%

Total & non-residential:

Total construction consents rose 12.6% in February to $1.68 billion ($1.42 billion), and 10% for the year to $20.855 billion ($18.956 billion).

Non-residential rose 28.3% for the month to $526 million ($410 million), and 11% for the year to $6.756 billion ($6.086 billion).

Attribution: Statistics NZ tables.

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Home consents get lift in January, though Stats NZ calls it flat

When Statistics NZ released the monthly building consent figures on Friday, it described the number of consents for new homes in January as “relatively flat”, after taking its seasonal adjustment into account.

There are several ways to look at this statistic, but “flat” is not a description that ought to be top of the list.

The 1916 consents for new homes issued in January were a higher January total than in any of the previous 13 years, and higher than in 16 of the last 18 years.

January is the traditional quiet month. A rise in January consents doesn’t mean consents will be higher through the rest of the year, but this January’s rise indicates a stronger market in standalone homes and 2 of the 3 intensive residential sectors.

Standalones were up 10% on the previous January but the annual figure fell slightly. Apartment consents (the most volatile market segment) were up over 16% for the month and have risen 34% over 12 months. Retirement village consents were halved for the month and, for the moving annual total, have been just short of the previous year’s tally. Suburban townhouses & flats were up on both counts, by over 23% for the month and nearly 10% for the year.

The higher January consent figure came off the back of a rise in consents through 2017 – consents exceeded 2700 in 6 of the previous 10 months, and 3000 in 2 of them. In 2016, consents exceeded 2700 in 4 months.

Using the seasonal adjustment smoothing mechanism, January matched December and was down slightly on October, and well short of the figures for those busier months – August, September & November.

It’s now 7 years since the residential construction market bottomed. As the global financial crisis took effect from late 2007, the consent level for new homes held up in January 2008 but hit its lowest level for that month in 45 years in 2009, falling to 812 consents. 2 years later the market still hadn’t picked up and January consents were down at 867.

The present level is more than double that, but despite a gradual rise in consents the number of new homes is still barely matching the net inflow of migrants, let alone natural population growth.

Statistics NZ released the monthly migration figures last week, showing a net inflow still above 70,000/year, although a new measure introduced last year gets the total down to 64,500.

That new measure defines migrants using their travel history and the “12/16-month rule”, a measure that requires a follow-up rather than reliance on the card filled in at the border on arrival.

The national consent numbers for January & the year to January (previous January & year in brackets):
Total consents for new homes:  1916 (1752), up 9.4%; 31,251 (30,123), up 3.7%
Total values & floor areas for new homes: month – $769 million ($619 million), up 24.4%; 351,000m² (322,000m²), up 8.9%; year – $11.626 billion ($10.625 billion), up 9.4%; 5.522 million m² (5.476 million m²), up 0.8%
Standalone homes: 1380 (1253), up 10.1%; 21,149 (21,277), down 0.6%
Apartments: 135 (116), up 16.4%; 3258 (2430), up 34.1%
Retirement village units: 49 (98), down 50%; 1902 (1915), down 0.7%
Suburban townhouses & flats: 352 (285), up 23.5%; 4942 (4501), up 9.8%

Auckland residential consents for January compared to January 2017, the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months, and the percentage increase for the year (and month for the region):
Region: 718 (512), up 40.2%; 11,073 (10,032), up 10.4%
Rodney: 46 (55), 1045 (861), up 21.4%
Albany: 130 (194), 2385 (2455), down 2.9%
North Shore: 78 (17), 622 (455), up 36.7%
Waitakere: 55 (18), 586 (648), down 9.6%
Waitemata & Gulf: 5 (4), 1363 (965), up 41.2%
Whau: 24 (7), 348 (293), up 18.8%
Albert-Eden-Roskill: 94 (22), 716 (660), up 8.5%
Orakei: 19 (8), 271 (240), up 12.9%
Maungakiekie-Tamaki: 55 (25), 667 (423), up 57.8%
Howick: 31 (15), 630 (520), up 21.2%
Manukau: 34 (17), 672 (441), up 52.4%
Manurewa-Papakura: 106 (50), 1043 (1079), down 3.3%
Franklin: 41 (80) 745 (992), down 24.9%

All construction for January compared to January 2017, and the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months:
Total: $1.42 billion ($1.108 billion), up 28.2%; $20.677 billion ($19.055 billion), up 8.5%
Non-residential: $1.389 billion ($1.086 billion), up 27.8%; $20.255 billion ($18.572 billion), up 9.1%

Attribution: Statistics NZ tables & release.

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Housing consents hold above 31,000/year, non-residential up 8%

Stats NZ said today building consents for new homes stayed just above an annual rate of 31,000 in December. In Auckland, the 10,867 consents were the highest level since 2004 and up 8.4% on 2016.

After 1752 consents nationally in January, consents were above 2100 every month and above 3000 twice.

The numbers of retirement village units, townhouses, flats & other units consented in Auckland in 2017 were records. There were also plenty of apartments consented, but not as many as in the early 2000s.

Stats NZ construction statistics manager Melissa McKenzie said: “Over a third of all new homes in New Zealand were consented in the Auckland region last year, which is in line with Auckland’s share of the New Zealand population. This is the first time since 2004 that the proportion of new homes consented in Auckland exceeded their share of the population.”

The 5549 multi-unit buildings consented in Auckland in 2017 were:

  • 2442 apartments – 75% of all apartments consented nationally
  • 868 retirement village units – a record high and accounting for 44% of all retirement village units consented nationally
  • 2239 townhouses, flats & units – a record high and accounting for 46% of all townhouses, flats & units consented nationally.

In contrast, only one-quarter (5318) of all new standalone house consents were for Auckland.

Non-residential up 8%

Building consents for all non-residential buildings including offices, education buildings, storage & cultural buildings were up 8% to $6.5 billion for the year.
Ms McKenzie said social & cultural buildings and hotels were the main contributors to the increase in value: “3 big projects consented last year were the NZ International Convention Centre, Auckland’s Aotea Centre and Turanga (Christchurch’s new central library). These boosted the category known as social, cultural & religious buildings.”

The non-residential building types with the highest value movements were:

  • social, cultural & religious – up $257 million to $630 million
  • hotels, motels & other short-term accommodation – up $208 million to $457 million
  • factories & industrial buildings – up $193 million to $662 million, and
  • education buildings – down $202 million to $1 billion.

Ms McKenzie said the decrease in the value of education buildings consented was mainly due to the boost of education-related consents in Auckland & Otago in 2016.

She said the increase in hotels, motels & other short-term accommodation consented coincided with a rise in international visitors: “Hotels in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch & the Queenstown-Lakes district have contributed to this increase.”

The national consent numbers for December & the 2017 year (previous December & year in brackets):
Total consents for new homes: 2169 (2205), 31,087 (30,066)
Total values & floor areas for new homes: $953 million ($989 million), down 3.6%; 392,000m² (405,000m²), down 3.2%; $13.454 billion ($12.532 billion), up 7.4%; 5.493 million m² (5.47 million m²), up 0.4%
Standalone homes: 1424 (1580), 21,022 (21,310)
Apartments: 240 (138), 3239 (2403)
Retirement village units: 175 (193), 1951 (1952)
Suburban townhouses & flats: 330 (294), 4875 (4401)

Auckland residential consents for December, compared to December 2016, and the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months:
Region: 876 (740), 10,867 (9930)
Rodney: 58 (60), 1054 (866)
Albany:  53 (170), 2449 (2288)
North Shore: 105 (28), 561 (451)
Waitakere: 35 (43), 529 (676)
Waitemata & Gulf: 6 (9), 1362 (1041)
Whau: 33 (14), 331 (297)
Albert-Eden-Roskill: 53 (112), 644 (667)
Orakei: 14 (15), 260 (242)
Maungakiekie-Tamaki: 20 (129), 637 (416)
Howick: 42 (22), 614 (522)
Manukau: 225 (21), 655 (460)
Manurewa-Papakura: 94 (59), 987 (1066)
Franklin: 38 (58), 784 (938)

All construction for December compared to December 2016, and the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months:
Total: $1.468 billion ($1.612 billion), down 8.9%; $20.354 billion ($19.03 billion), up 7%
Non-residential: $485 million ($595 million), down 18.5%; $6.499 billion ($6.019 billion), up 8%.

Attribution: Stats NZ tables & releases.

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Auckland jump pushes home consents over 31,000/year, standalone share drops further

Consents for new homes jumped over the 31,000/year mark in November after being stuck in a 30,000/year band for most of the previous year.

Stats NZ said today the number of new homes consented in Auckland hit a 15-year high of 1450 in November, boosted by apartments. You can check the numbers around Auckland’s 13 wards below.

This rise in Auckland helped lift the national total of new homes consented to a 13-year high.

Consents for new homes & upgrades nationally for the year were worth $930 million more than for the previous 12 months.

Stats NZ construction statistics manager Melissa McKenzie said: “In November, Auckland home consents reached their second-highest level on record. This is beaten only by October 2002, when nearly 2000 new homes were consented due to a much larger spike in apartments.”

Nationally, 3262 new homes were consented in November (3005 in November 2016), including the highest number of townhouses, flats & units on record – 577 – and a 9-year high of 543 apartments.

“November is typically the month with the highest number of new homes consented, as people try to get plans approved before Christmas,” Ms McKenzie said.

“November’s rebound in home consents was driven by apartments, which tend to fluctuate a lot and were particularly low in October.
“Looking at the longer-term picture, building consents for apartments & townhouses have seen double-digit growth year after year, while consents for standalone houses have levelled off.”

Standalone homes’ share of total consents for the year fell from 70.4% in November 2016 to 68%.

The national consent numbers for November & the year to November (previous November & year in brackets):
Total consents for new homes: 3262 (3005), 31,123 (30,399)
Total values for new homes:  $1.118 billion ($1.001 billion), $13.49 billion ($12.561 billion)
Standalone homes: 1870 (1886), 21,178 (21,391)
Apartments: 543 (407), 3137 (2692)
Retirement village units: 272 (205), 1969 (1918)
Suburban townhouses & flats: 577 (507), 4839 (4398)

Auckland residential consents for November, compared to November 2016, and the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months:
Region: 1450 (1188), 10,731 (10,137)
Rodney: 89 (55), 1056 (909)
Albany: 255 (286), 2466 (2274)
North Shore: 25 (26), 484 (566)
Waitakere: 66 (84), 537 (664)
Waitemata & Gulf: 388 (155), 1365 (1125)
Whau: 34 (19), 312 (307)
Albert-Eden-Roskill: 36 (104), 703 (699)
Orakei: 67 (42), 261 (297)
Maungakiekie-Tamaki: 138 (21), 746 (306)
Howick: 127 (25), 594 (546)
Manukau: 90 (129), 451 (465)
Manurewa-Papakura: 88 (116), 952 (1062)
Franklin: 47 (126), 804 (917)

All construction for November compared to November 2016, and the latest 12 months compared to the previous 12 months:
Total: $1.881 billion ($1.607 billion), up 17.1%; $20.498 billion ($19.029 billion), up 7.7%
Non-residential: $549 million ($411 million), up 33.6%; $6.609 billion ($5.98 billion), up 10.5%.

Attribution: Stats NZ tables & release.

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