Goff gets agreement on council budget consultation and starts to tighten grip on CCOs

Auckland Council’s finance & performance committee held a 9-hour session yesterday which indicated some directions under the new mayor, Phil Goff: a closer watch on its commercial operations, a tighter rein on costs and a bigger role for local boards.

Helped by committee chair Ross Clow’s clear intention to keep things flowing, the council made progress without the usual surfeit of political speech-making, with mostly succinct questioning, and an awareness of the subject matter as it had been circulated early enough to be digested.

Mr Goff made it clear right from his first meeting that questions would be questions, and he’s drilled the message home. His next task is to convince the boards of the council-controlled organisations that they aren’t autonomous, that when the council wants an answer it should be given a proper one, and that those organisations will have to lift their performance – not just by a smidgeon, but by multi-million-dollar shifts in both savings & earnings.

That seismic shift in performance would be worth far more than a bed tax, in both dollars & perception, though that tax is still on the wishlist.

The council finance committee’s main tasks yesterday were to go through the quarterly reports of the council-controlled organisations and of the council itself, approve the pro forma half-yearly accounts to 31 December and, toward the end of the day, discuss the letters of expectation the mayor had written for the council-controlled organisations and, the last, to put finishing touches to the public consultation document on the council’s annual budget, to go out in the New Year.

The committee agreed to one amendment to the mayor’s consultation proposal – put by new councillor Desley Simpson and seconded by the mayor – to seek other operating revenue streams to minimise the impact for ratepayers.

A proposal from councillors Wayne Walker & John Watson to consult on introducing chemical-free weed control in public parks & reserves & urbanised areas, including the option for a targeted rate to fund any additional costs, was defeated, though not entirely rejected. A number of councillors supported the principle but there was debate on costs and some aspects of implementation, and the mayor said that, if it was to be introduced, it ought to be done properly & after thorough examination.

The third amendment, proposing such a review, became a note to be forwarded to the council’s environment & community committee.

The revised budget consultation proposal goes to the council’s governing body for approval tomorrow.

This story outlines the main business of yesterday’s meeting, but not the real content – the debates & position-taking. I’ll try to get that extra story posted for Friday.

Attribution: Council committee meeting.

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