Archive | Colin Godfrey

Court rules on interim liquidator call for original Godfrey corporate trustee

Published 22 September 2006


Justice Geoffrey Venning put some more flesh on the Godfrey property companies story yesterday with a 35-minute oral judgment in which he ordered that an interim liquidator be appointed to First City Trust No 2 Ltd, former corporate trustee for the 409-unit Harbour City apartment development on the corner of Fort & Gore Sts.



In photo, Harbour City is the central tower between the Lumley Centre & Vero Centre. Click to enlarge.


The application for an interim liquidator was made by the liquidators of 2 other Godfrey companies, Eden Crescent Ltd & The 100 Ltd. Their principal creditor is Inland Revenue, claiming a total $12.5 million.


Inland Revenue withdrew its own application to wind First City Trust No 2 up on 11 September after that company’s role as corporate trustee of Colin Godfrey’s First City Trust was transferred to a newly incorporated company, Gore Street Trustee Ltd.


Inland Revenue failed earlier this week to have an interim liquidator appointed to Gore Street Trustee, settling on Tuesday for that company’s sole director, Doug Williams, to be replaced by insolvency practitioner Anthony McCullagh, managing director of Horwath Corporate (Auckland) Ltd, and for some arrangements securing payments for itself & unsecured creditors.


Justice Venning made the order appointing the Official Assignee as interim liquidator at 2.35pm on Thursday, largely on the evidence of David Levin (McCallum Petterson Ltd) as a liquidator of Eden Crescent & The 100, developers of 2 apartment blocks near the Auckland High Court, one Eden Crescent and the other called Century on Anzac, on Anzac Avenue.


The judge said Inland Revenue was owed $7.3 million from The 100, $5.2 million from Eden Crescent, and the liquidators were concerned that money would be dissipated when Harbour City settlements started at the end of October.


In one affidavit, Mr Levin said he’d found $931,000 had been transferred to the First City Trust from Eden Crescent between 1 April 2003-26 November 2004 and it was shown as a loan, with no indication it was for goods or services. Another $2.2 million was similarly transferred from The 100.


At that time, Mr Godfrey controlled all the companies. He was banned from being a company director for 4½ years from 4 May, bankrupted on 23 August and is now living on the Sunshine Coast. Mr Williams replaced him as director of the corporate trustees, but not as shareholder.


And in submissions to Justice Venning on Wednesday, Bran Dickey, counsel for the Eden Crescent & The 100 liquidators, said Mr Godfrey still controlled the First City Trust because he was appointor, settler & principal beneficiary.


Mr Dickey argued that Mr Williams, as a director of Godfrey companies for some time before Mr Godfrey’s bankruptcy, had also shown a persistent failure to provide proper accounts & records as required under the Companies Act.


Justice Venning said Mr Williams had transferred the Fort St development from First City Trust No 2 to Gore Street Trustee 7 days after the liquidators of Eden Crescent & The 100 had filed statutory demands for $3.15 million. An application to set that aside had yet to be heard. Meanwhile, the judge said, “Mr Levin believed Mr Williams had acted to strip Eden Crescent & The 100 of their assets.”


Justice Venning said there was an issue as to whether the First City Trust No 2 trust deed contained an exclusion from indemnity clause because Mr Levin hadn’t been able to see the whole trust deed. It was something Mr Williams could easily have sorted out, the judge said.


Mr Williams had also said money flowing through First City Trust No 2 wasn’t in the form of loans. He believed Mr Godfrey had used the company as a call account to send funds to First City Beijing.


Counsel for First City No 2, Geoff Clews, had argued there was no urgency or need for an interim liquidator because the settlement on Tuesday between Gore Street, Mr Godfrey (as defendants), Gore Street’s 3 secured creditors (ANZ National Bank, Structured Finance (NZ) Ltd & Bridgecorp Ltd) effectively protected the positions of Eden Crescent & The 100. But Justice Venning agreed that would be so only if an exclusion clause on the indemnity didn’t exist.


But the judge said the appointment could be made if found necessary or expedient, and given the lack of faith the plaintiffs & the court could have in present management, it was definitely expedient to make the liquidation appointment.


Earlier stories:


21 September 2006: Judge to rule on call for interim liquidator at second Godfrey company


20 September 2006: Lenders keep interim liquidator out of one Godfrey company, similar fight today


18 September: IRD & banks fight over interim liquidation proposal for Godfrey company


 


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Attribution: Court hearings, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Judge to rule on call for interim liquidator at second Godfrey company

Published 21 September 2006


High Court judge Geoffrey Venning will rule this afternoon on an application to put one of Auckland apartment developer Colin Godfrey’s companies into interim liquidation, the second such application for a Godfrey company this week.



The first application, by Inland Revenue, resulted in an insolvency practitioner, Anthony McCulloch, being appointed as director – not interim liquidator – of Gore Street Trustee Ltd, corporate trustee for the First City Trust.


Justice Raynor Asher accepted a settlement agreement on Tuesday which introduced a charge over assets in the 37-storey Harbour City apartment project on the corner of Fort & Gore Sts in downtown Auckland.


Although I haven’t seen the detail of that agreement, I understand the charge will enable Inland Revenue to collect gst when buyers of the apartments start to settle in October, instead of being stuck down the creditor chain behind the 3 secured creditors, ANZ National Bank, Structured Finance (NZ) Ltd & Bridgecorp Ltd.


In that position of preferred (unsecured) creditor, Inland Revenue would have seen the lenders collect their money but the estimated $9.5 million gst bill forming the bulk of the estimated $12.3 million shortfall faced by the unsecured creditors.


The lenders, with a combined $123 million security, joined forces with the defendant trustee company & Mr Godfrey to reach the agreement with Inland Revenue which saw its application for an interim liquidator struck out and substantive application for a liquidator put on hold.


The application for an interim liquidator on Wednesday was for First City Trust No 2 Ltd, which had been corporate trustee for the First City Trust until that role was transferred to Gore Street Trustee.


This time the applicants were David Levin & Barry Jordan (McCallum Petterson Ltd) as liquidators of Eden Crescent Ltd & The 100 Ltd.


Brian Dickey (from Meredith Connell, the law firm which acts as Crown Solicitors in Auckland) appeared for the liquidators (Inland Revenue, in its application, had been represented by its own lawyer & a barrister).


Mr Dickey had a hard time convincing Justice Venning of the need for urgency in appointing a liquidator, the judge finding his primary concerns amounted to speculation.


Although Mr Dickey said First City Trust No 2 director Douglas Williams had a record at Godfrey companies of not providing proper accounts & records, counsel for the company, Geoff Clews, said it was premature to say Mr Williams wasn’t acting properly at this company as he’d only taken over when Mr Godfrey was banned from being a director in May.


Mr Dickey was concerned at the transfer of several million dollars to First City Beijing, but Mr Clews said Mr Williams understood that money was paid into a call account and passed on.


Although Mr Godfrey was banned from being a company director and bankrupted in August, Mr Dickey said he still controlled the First City Trust as appointor, settler & principal beneficiary and he had transferred First City No 2’s physical asset (an interest in settlements on the Harbour City project) without any evidence of a payment.


And although the liquidators of the 2 plaintiff companies in this action had been unable to see the whole of the trust deed, they believed it contained a clause similar to one in other Godfrey trust deeds, which precluded the companies from claiming an indemnity against the trust.


“It creates a trust trading, without any ability to pay its debts,” Mr Dickey said.


Mr Clews said the settlement agreement for the new corporate trustee company, Gore Street Trustee, meant creditors would be dealt with in a strict order of priority, but a charge had been created for the benefit of unsecured creditors.


Nothing was likely to change before the substantive liquidation application is heard (its first call is on Thursday 28 September). Mr Clews said the first tranche of Harbour City apartment settlements was now due to occur on 31 October-1 November.


Earlier stories:


20 September 2006: Lenders keep interim liquidator out of one Godfrey company, similar fight today


18 September: IRD & banks fight over interim liquidation proposal for Godfrey company


 


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Attribution: Court hearings, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Lenders keep interim liquidator out of one Godfrey company, similar fight today

Published 20 September 2006


One of downtown Auckland apartment developer Colin Godfrey’s trust-minding companies escaped being placed in the hands of an Inland Revenue-chosen interim liquidator yesterday with a settlement agreed in court.



But another of Mr Godfrey’s companies, also a trust minder, faces a similar application today from the liquidators of 2 of his apartment development companies.


Mr Godfrey himself is already bankrupt, banned from being a company director for 4½ years and, it seems, now living on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, well away from his Auckland troubles.


Inland Revenue sought the appointment of an interim liquidator to Gore Street Trustee Ltd, which had come to be the trustee of First City Trust, owner of the First City Developments group’s 37-storey Fort St apartment block, Harbour City.


The application was on a just & equitable basis – at the moment Inland Revenue is a prospective creditor for gst, which won’t fall due until settlements in October.


Lined up against Inland Revenue were 3 secured creditors – ANZ National Bank, Structured Finance (NZ) Ltd & Bridgecorp Ltd – which appeared in the court case as creditors (in opposition to the IRD proposal), along with first & second defendants Gore Street & Mr Godfrey.


They stand to recoup their $123 million of loans on the Harbour City project, while Multiplex, as builder, has been paid progressively. But appointment of a liquidator or interim liquidator would move Inland Revenue, as a preferential creditor, up from fourth in line for payment to first.


The gst liability was expected to be $9.5 million, but that would be part of an estimated $12.3 million shortfall to be met by unsecured creditors.


After half a day’s court time, during which Inland Revenue counsel James Coleman painted a bleak picture of how the Godfrey businesses have been run, the settlement compromise agreed before Justice Raynor Asher ensured the lenders would maintain their secured positions, with some undisclosed satisfaction of Inland Revenue’s position.


Inland Revenue had wanted Bruce McCallum (McCallum Petterson Ltd) appointed as interim liquidator and didn’t want the lenders’ choice, Anthony McCullagh (Horwath Corporate Auckland Ltd), saying he’d done work for Bridgecorp and had been involved in the winebox case.


Under the settlement, however, Mr McCullach will replace Mr Godfrey’s choice, Douglas Williams, as director of Gore Street Trustee. Justice Asher struck out the application to appoint an interim trustee and stayed the substantive liquidation proceedings.


The second application for an interim liquidator is by the liquidators of 2 other Godfrey apartment companies, The 100 Ltd & Eden Crescent Ltd, all from McCallum Petterson. They want an interim liquidator appointed to First City Trust No 2 Ltd, which was the First City Trust’s previous corporate trustee.


Inland Revenue withdrew its application to wind First City Trust No 2 up on 11 September, after that company’s role as corporate trustee for the First City Trust was shifted to Gore Street Trustee.


Earlier story:


18 September 2006: IRD & banks fight over interim liquidation proposal for Godfrey company


 


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Attribution: Court hearings, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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IRD & banks fight over interim liquidation proposal for Godfrey company

Published 18 September 2006


While bankrupt & banned Auckland cbd property developer Colin Godfrey was supposedly sunning himself on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast (nobody was confirming the precise whereabouts), lawyers for Inland Revenue & 3 of the Godfrey companies’ lenders were in court today fighting over the seemingly innocuous issue of comparatively small change from the First City Developments group’s 37-storey Fort St apartment block.



Inland Revenue has applied to wind up Gore Street Trustee Ltd, the Godfrey company which had come to be the trustee of the development’s owner, First City Trust. As a prospective creditor for gst – the debts won’t fall due until settlements in October – Inland Revenue applied to Justice Raynor Asher in the Auckland High Court to appoint interim liquidators to Gore Street.


The hearing should finish on Tuesday and Justice Asher said he expected to be able to issue a decision by the end of the week.


Mr Godfrey has developed a number of central Auckland apartment projects over the past 5 years, including 100 The Avenue on Anzac Avenue, another block round the corner on Eden Crescent and, most recently, the Harbour City development on the corner of Fort & Gore Sts.


Unfortunately, Inland Revenue counsel James Coleman told the judge, the IRD found out that the companies owning the previous developments had short-changed the department by several million dollars by under-representing sales then dissipating the gst which ought to have been paid.


Although Mr Godfrey was bankrupted on 23 August, banned from being a director for 4½ years from 4 May and was out of the country, Mr Coleman said Inland Revenue expected the same failure to pay gst out of the Harbour City settlements because the director of Gore Street, Douglas Williams, had been a director of numerous other Godfrey companies which had failed to keep proper accounts & records.


Inland Revenue has had something of a runaround trying to tie down some returns out of the Godfrey companies. It had applied to wind up the First City Trust’s previous corporate trustee, First City Trust No 2 Ltd, but withdrew that application on 11 September. There was no point in pursuing that liquidation because the trustee role had moved on.


Mr Godfrey had been both director & shareholder of First City Trust No 2, but resigned in June. Mr Williams was appointed, resigned on 31 July and was reappointed on 29 August; John Martin, a director of Contributory Mortgage Investments Ltd, was appointed on 31 July and resigned on 29 August.


Gore Street was incorporated on 4 July with Mr Williams as its director & holder of the solitary share. IRD counsel Mr Coleman said Mr Godfrey was the beneficiary of the First City Trust and had the power to appoint trustees. “On 6 July he, under that power, appointed Gore Street as trustee.”


Mr Coleman said Inland Revenue sought the appointment of Bruce McCallum (McCallum Petterson Ltd) as interim liquidator through its position as prospective creditor, on just & equitable grounds (based on the previous corporate trustee’s “persistent & habitual failure to keep accounts & records”) and because of a loss of confidence in the director, Mr Williams, “by virtue of his failure to comply with tax obligations, both personally & with relation to companies”.


Mr Coleman alleged Mr Godfrey had “fraudulently paid away gst” at previous developments. At 100 Anzac Avenue, $1.6 million of gst should have been paid on $16 million of sales in 2003, but wasn’t paid. Mr Coleman said the level of sales was under-returned and should have been about $22 million.


Peter Brannigan was appointed liquidator of The 100 Ltd in April 2005 and replaced by McCallum Petterson liquidators in June 2005. At the Eden Crescent development, gst was again not paid on purported sales totalling $23 million. Mr Coleman said actual sales had been $8 million higher.


“The defendants acknowledged there had been dishonesty but said it was the fault of employees rather than Mr Godfrey.”


Mr Coleman said one company Mr Williams had been a director of, Auckland Labour Services Ltd, paid no tax from the outset and, when it was wound up on Inland Revenue’s application on 7 July, it owed $500,000 of PAYE & $750,000 of gst.


“That company took over the business of selling apartments from Future Planning Ltd (placed in voluntary liquidation in April 2005).”


Geoff Clews, counsel for the defendants in this week’s action and for other Godfrey companies, said the documents in this case didn’t raise any issue of fraud and Mr Williams didn’t accept there was any dishonesty at Auckland Labour Services.


At Fort St, Mr Coleman said the $123 million liability for the 406-unit development was secured by 3 lenders – ANZ National Bank, Structured Finance (NZ) Ltd & Bridgecorp Ltd – which appear in the court case as creditors (in opposition to the IRD proposal), along with first & second defendants Gore Street & Mr Godfrey.


When the lenders were paid out (in full), there was expected to be a $12.9 million (reduced to $12.3 million) shortfall to unsecured creditors. The gst liability was expected to be $9.5 million. In the middle of some changing figures (the secured liabilities rose and a couple of other changes were made), the IRD had its eye on just over $3 million.


Mr Coleman said there would be defence argument that the new trustee hadn’t demonstrated any non-compliance so shouldn’t be penalised, but he said if consequences could be escape simply by changing trustees, they’d be changed all the time.


Inland Revenue’s concern was that the gst owed would be paid away to others, or the remaining Harbour City apartments would be sold at a discount once the secured creditors had got their money (resulting in less gst payable).


He said the lenders argued that appointing an interim liquidator would reduce the value of the remaining apartments, but Inland Revenue said an orderly selldown was possible by giving an insolvency practitioner the resources to act as a director. However, the parties hadn’t been able to agree on the choice of insolvency practitioner – Mr McCallum preferred by Inland Revenue, Anthony McCullagh (Horwath Corporate Auckland Ltd) preferred by the lenders. Inland Revenue said Mr McCullagh had done work for Bridgecorp and had been involved in the winebox case.


Earlier stories (apart from numerous mentions in the U column):


10 June 2006: Judge gives Auckland Labour Services time to get money for IRD via Australian gst refund to First City


1 June 2006: Godfrey-related Auckland Labour Services staves off liquidation


31 March 2006: IRD discloses it’s investigating Godfrey during move to wind up Auckland Labour Services


 


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Attribution: Company statement, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Judge gives Auckland Labour Services time to get money for IRD via Australian gst refund to First City

Published 10 June 2006


Auckland Labour Services Ltd, a company related to troubled city property developer Colin Godfrey, has been allowed to continue its attempt to find the finance to pay Inland Revenue, although the IRD believes some of the arrangements, in Australia, may be shams.



In the Auckland High Court on Friday, Associate Judge John Faire couldn’t accept that Inland Revenue’s interests would be prejudiced by allowing Auckland Labour Services the 7 weeks it wanted for funding to be put together in Australia, through a gst refund to another company there.


The judge had adjourned the application from 1 to 9 June for the company’s lawyer, Geoff Clews, to give the court an undertaking to advise the court & Inland Revenue of any material change in the company’s circumstances within 48 hours of that occurring.


Back in court on Friday, Mr Clews produced an affidavit from Mr Godfrey, Auckland Labour Services director Douglas Williams and a director of the Australian development company seeking the Australian gst refund, then found himself fighting an Inland Revenue attempt to wind the company up rather than just getting the expected further adjournment.


But after 45 minutes of submission, clarification & discussion, Associate Judge Faire granted the adjournment to the High Court’s liquidations list on Thursday 29 June at 10am.


Auckland Labour Services director Mr Williams is also a shareholder with former director Stephen Catsicas, who’s a former director of a number of companies in Mr Godfrey’s First City Developments Ltd group.


When Inland Revenue’s application to wind Auckland Labour Services up was before the Auckland High Court in April, Leo Farmer, for Inland Revenue, said the debt had reached $306,000.


Mr Farmer said the company contended a refund was owed to a related company but Inland Revenue said the High Court rules prevented the setoff. Tracy Spencer, appearing for Auckland Labour Services on that occasion, said the funds would go to Gosford Investments Ltd, whose sole director & shareholder is Mr Godfrey. It wasn’t a request to the commissioner to make the offset. She said it was also possible to call on other companies in the group to satisfy the debt.


In court on Friday, Mr Clews said a conditional loan offer had been made for the first of 3 proposed subdivision transactions by the Australian development company, but Associate Judge Faire said it triggered some alarm bells because the loan was conditional on presales and he had no information on what presale level was required.


While Mr Farmer said Mr Williams had written an affidavit saying Auckland Labour Services had no assets, the judge found a statement from Mr Williams that it did have assets – the debts of Mr Godfrey’s First City Group. One company in that group, Gosford Investments Ltd, was relying on a gst refund but hadn’t got it yet.


Mr Farmer said the claimed credits were “nowhere near completed and are subject to investigation.”


Mr Clews said investigation alone wasn’t reason to liquidate the company and, he added: “It does seem the Commissioner is intent to pursue these companies into liquidation, come what may. He has statutory powers and to my understanding he has not used those powers…..


“The Commissioner is able to obtain information about the First City group. There seems no need to overlay that with a liquidation.”


At the end of all this, Associate Judge Faire wanted answers to a handful of questions:

Have any of the contracts in Australia settled?
When was the gst application to the Australian Tax Office made?
He wanted evidence from a properly qualified person on the Australian law on when a gst refund is made
Assuming the Australian gst refund has been applied for, whether any direction or decision on it has been given which might affect the time when the refund can be made
And he wanted confirmation that a refund was expected.

Earlier stories:


1 June 2006: Godfrey-related Auckland Labour Services staves off liquidation


31 March 2006: IRD discloses it’s investigating Godfrey during move to wind up Auckland Labour Services


 


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Attribution: Court hearing, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Godfrey-related Auckland Labour Services staves off liquidation

Published 1 June 2006


Auckland Labour Services Ltd survived Inland Revenue’s attempt to have it wound up in the Auckland High Court today, with an undertaking on refinancing required by Friday 9 June and an adjournment probable from then until Thursday 29 June to allow settlement.



Auckland Labour Services’ director is Douglas Williams, Forrest Hill, who’s also a shareholder with former director Stephen Catsicas, Freemans Bay.


At the last hearing of the application on the Auckland High Court liquidations list, Auckland Labour Services counsel Tracy Spencer said the funds would go to Gosford Investments Ltd, whose sole director & shareholder was property developer Colin Godfrey, and it was also possible to call on other companies in the group to satisfy the debt.


In court today, counsel for the company, Geoff Clews, said it would take 45 days for refinancing funds to become available from an Australian company. $95,000 of the company’s core debt was gst, $172,000 Paye & related withholdings, and the balance of the claim was penalty & interest. There were no other creditors because this company had a very limited role in providing labour services, he said.


Inland Revenue lawyer Leo Farmer said the department had carefully considered the matters raised “but what it amounts to is yet another adjournment & yet another promise” deferring resolution of an application filed in December.


Associate Judge Faire said Inland Revenue was a priority creditor, which made him less uneasy about an adjournment. The company wasn’t trading and there was no prospect of the assets being dissipated. However, Mr Farmer said the potential remained for the company to start operating again and penalties would continue to accrue.


Mr Clews said if a liquidator was appointed “there is a strong possibility the outside finance will not come. The director of Auckland Labour Services is Mr Williams. I am instructed that he is a member of the New South Wales bar and he is very concerned to avoid the situation where a company he is a director is put in liquidation.”


The judge felt Inland Revenue might be more prejudiced if he wound the company up, but agreed to require an undertaking suggested by Mr Farmer, “to advise the court & the commissioner of any material change in the company’s circumstances within 48 hours of same occurring. This should protect the commissioner from any adverse consequences of the company recommencing trading or incurring any liability to creditors.”


That undertaking is required by Friday 9 June. If it’s given, Associate Judge Faire said he would adjourn the matter to Thursday 29 June to check progress with the loan arrangements.


Earlier story, 31 March 2006: IRD discloses it’s investigating Godfrey during move to wind up Auckland Labour Services


 


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Attribution: Court hearing, Companies Office records, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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IRD discloses it’s investigating Godfrey during move to wind up Auckland Labour Services

Published 31 March 2006


Inland Revenue is investigating the tax affairs of property developer Colin Godfrey, including a company of which he is neither a director nor shareholder.



The investigation was disclosed in the Auckland High Court today during the resumed hearing an application by Inland Revenue to wind up Auckland Labour Services Ltd, whose director is Douglas Williams and shareholders are Mr Williams & Stephen Catsicas.


The application was made in the court’s weekly liquidations list yesterday, when Associate Judge John Faire asked why a deed of acknowledgment of the debt should not be acted upon.


IRD counsel Leo Farmer said the debt included a significant amount of PAYE and the judge decided to give Auckland Labour Services until 9.45am today to produce affidavits substantiating its assets & liabilities. “Unless I am satisfied there is some substance to this company I’m going to allow the plaintiff to proceed,” he said.


Counsel for the company Tracy Spencer – who used to act in liquidations for Inland Revenue when she was at Crown solicitor Meredith Connell – got affidavits completed by Mr Williams & Mr Godfrey.


They disclosed that Auckland Labour Services was relying on a gst credit to satisfy the debt. But Mr Farmer said that credit might be a long time coming: “Serious matters continue to be investigated and it is unlikely this credit will be forthcoming for quite some time,” he said.


He said what was holding up the inquiry was investigations into Mr Godfrey’s affairs. “There is a suggestion that Mr Godfrey works in the capacity of a director of Auckland Labour Services by signing cheques etc.”


Because Associate Judge Faire saw no sense in appointing a liquidator now, when the liquidator would only be pursuing the company to get the same answers as they court had received, he adjourned the hearing to the liquidations list on Thursday 28 April at 10am.


He also told Mr Farmer it would be helpful to have an updated position on the input claim which has been made not by Auckland Labour Services but by Gosford Investments Ltd, in which Mr Godfrey is both sole director & shareholder.


Mr Godfrey is director of development company First City Group Ltd & numerous other development companies, including Harbour City Apartments Ltd & Residences at Harbour City Ltd, the apartment block rising on the corner of Fort & Gore Sts in the cbd.




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Attribution: Court hearings, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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