Archive | Franklin growth

300ha Wesley special housing area approved

Commissioners have approved the 300ha special housing area around Wesley College near Pukekohe, which will provide for up to 5000 homes in 10 stages. 1000 homes are proposed in the first stage.

The development will come with a local centre, a new rail station, an internal focus on getting about on foot or on bikes and a larger supply of affordable housing than the 7% required.

Most of the development will be medium-density housing, with more intensive housing, including apartments in buildings up to 4 storeys high, at the centre.

Commissioners Leigh McGregor (chair), Rebecca Skidmore, Philip Brown & Murray Kay heard the application by Grafton Downs Ltd (Wesley College Trust Board & Pact 2086 Trust) in May and released their decisions on Monday.

The land decisions are approval for a variation from the proposed Auckland unitary plan and, secondly, resource consent enabling subdivision of the site, mostly under the control of the Methodist Church, at 801 Paerata Rd, Paerata North.

The variation enables rezoning from future urban & special purpose: education to mixed housing urban & local centre. The decision will also enable up to 15,000m² total gross retail floor area and commercial services.

The college, which is been on this site since 1923, will be relocated nearby, but it intends to retain control over the development of the project throughout the 20-30 years it’s expected to take.

Wesley was in the first tranche of special housing areas approved in October 2013 under the housing accord between the Government & Auckland Council, with a small extension approved in the second tranche.

The site is large at approximately 300 hectares and is bordered by State Highway 22 (Karaka & Paerata Rds) – the main route from the Southern Motorway to Pukekohe – borders the site, and the  main trunk railway line runs along its eastern boundary.

The Wesley local town centre precinct will be developed between the college buildings & State Highway 22.

One issue not resolved concerns the potential to turn Sim Rd into a more direct route to Pukekohe, knocking several minutes off the journey. The middle section is unformed and, since a bridge across the stream collapsed a few years ago, this middle segment has been used by off-road vehicles, turning it into a muddy quagmire which is virtually impassable.

Ms McGregor noted the concern of farm owners that the road would eventually be reconnected & upgraded, producing heavy traffic flows, but said: “Whether Sim Rd is reconnected depends on the outcome of the NZ Transport Agency & Auckland Transport’s long-term arterial road strategies for the area and is a matter beyond Grafton Downs’ control.”

Counsel for Grafton Downs, Sue Simons, said in hearing submissions the applicant’s design philosophy & charitable focus, together with the demographics of the area, meant affordable homes would be well in excess of the housing accord requirements.

The subdivision design also included a “floating” sub-precinct B which would allow for higher density housing around the passenger transport interchange. The site of the sub-precinct will only be determined once the location of the interchange is decided.

The applicant wanted it to have a 400m radius, but Auckland Transport suggested doubling that to 800m. However, after evidence that this would damage the integrity of the overall design, the commissioners have agreed to the 400m radius.

Lot sizes will vary from an average of 400-450m² to higher intensities of 150-300m². Applications for framework plans & subdivision to achieve those development patterns will be applied for later.

The resource consent for subdivision allows 10m-tall houses in the less intensive areas and 16.5m in the densest area.

Cycleways & narrow internal roads are proposed to create a low-speed residential environment with good amenity and to encourage walking & cycling, while at the same time having a dissuasive effect on using private vehicles for local needs. A green network of pathways will be developed along the enhanced stream edges, the transmission line corridor & neighbourhood recreation reserves. Ms Simons said the community wasn’t intended to be a “car-centric commuter town”.

Onstreet parking may be provided for in higher density areas, and one of the applicant’s background reports suggested communal parking areas might be considered at the framework plan stage.

Link: Paerata, Wesley special housing area

Attribution: Decision.

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Bulk of Franklin rural & coastal plan change still within Auckland to be made operative

Auckland Council has approved making Franklin plan change 14 – for rural & coastal development – operative, apart from subdivision rules in one zone and an unresolved appeal  on the transfer of subdivision rights.

The subdivision rules excluded from approval are for the Runciman countryside living zone, which are still subject to Environment Court mediation.

Variation 13 to the plan change, which would prohibit the transfer of subdivision rights from the Waikato district into Auckland, has yet to be heard by hearing commissioners.

The former Franklin District Council notified plan change 14 in September 2003. Decisions were made in 2006, but in 2007 the district council withdrew parts of the plan change over concerns that it would provide too many opportunities for countryside living.

In the carve-up of the Franklin district when Auckland Council was formed in 2010, about 60% of the affected area was incorporated into the Waikato district and a small portion in the Hauraki district, leaving about a third in Auckland.

Among issues the plan change covers are growth management of the villages, rural & coastal subdivision, and specific sections on urban subdivision, medium-density housing & village business zones.

Cllr Des Morrison – a former Franklin district councillor elected for the first term of the new council but retiring in October – told Auckland Council’s regional development & operations committee today the 13 years it had taken to get this much of the plan change operative demonstrated why the system needed to change.

He said the process began in 2001 because of the growth coming out of the Auckland urban area, and the plan change reflected a need to accommodate growth.

However, he said he was horrified at the initial Franklin response: “First of all there was no vision, it was really about accommodating growth, which was an 80:20 split, 80% into the rural area, which went against all the things we’d talked about in the Auckland spatial plan, elite soils, that sort of thing.

“The regional growth strategy gave birth to the district growth strategy, which went into the spatial plan. There are some real learnings from the lack of a clear plan, the lack of a vision, and so came a period from 2004 where there has been appeal after appeal, and dollars after dollars dissipated in the rounds of appeals.”

And at – or almost at – the end of the process? “It’s out of date, superseded by the unitary plan.”

Cllr Noelene Raffills, who chairs the new council’s hearings committee, added a footnote: “We actually inherited 80 agreements & reports that were described as intractable. We have very few left. To take 10 years to do something means by definition it will be out of date when we come to the end of it, something not to repeat.”

Attribution: Council committee meeting & agenda.

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Franklin council adopts annual plan & transport strategy, brings Pukekohe South stormwater funding forward

Published 30 May 2010

The Franklin District Council adopted its annual plan, adopted a draft integrated transport strategy for consultation and approved a stormwater works project for Pukekohe South when it met on Thursday.

 

Mayor Mark Ball said after the meeting the council was trying to leave the district in the best possible shape before it’s dismembered in October. After the 9 October local body elections, part of Franklin will go into the new Auckland Council, part will go to the Waikato District Council and part to the Hauraki District Council.

 

The Franklin council will administer the first 4 months of its annual plan. From 1 November, the other 3 councils will take over its administration.

 

The existing council set an average district-wide rate increase of 4.2% Complicating that, all properties in the district were revalued this year and the gst charge on payments made after 1 October will be at 15%.

 

The draft transport strategy has 6 action plans for consultation with the community. The council intends to adopt it in August and to leave it as a guide for the successor councils.

 

The council decided to bring funding forward a year for the stormwater works west of Manukau Rd, Pukekohe, to install new stormwater pipes in the Nelson St area and to undertake erosion protection work in the downstream open channel west of Manukau Rd. This will relieve flooding on 56 properties and enable business land west of Manukau Rd to be developed.

 

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Attribution: Council release, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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Franklin releases growth strategy

Published 3 September 2007Franklin District Council released its district growth strategy on 23 August. It’s designed to ensure that the strategic direction is consistent with national & regional policies & plans, while reflecting the particular needs & circumstances of the district, and lays out a blueprint for the next 50 years.

The preamble says: “The long-term vision for Franklin is of ‘a country lifestyle in harmony with our environment. It is a vision of ‘a diverse people living within defined, planned & serviced country towns & villages surrounded by countryside offering great living, working & recreational options, connected to cities by well developed transport links’…..

“The strategy identifies sufficient land to accommodate a projected population of 108,000 people by 2051 (just over a doubling of the population). This rate of growth is faster than the ‘high’ projection in the Auckland regional growth strategy.

“It was considered preferable to explore the effects of more rapid population growth as most of the risks of managing growth relate to underestimating rather than overestimating the pace of change. If population growth is slower than projected, then the release of land for new development and building of new infrastructure can be postponed.

“Future growth will be accommodated through infill & redevelopment in existing urban areas, greenfield development & rural living. A higher share of the district’s future population will be accommodated in the northern sector, making use of significant areas of available zoned land & existing infrastructure, while at the same time reducing pressures on the coast.

“Future growth in the northern sector also provides the opportunity to achieve a high level of integration between employment, transport infrastructure & population growth at the district-wide & local levels, including support for public transport through increased densities in the towns.”

The council’s website has the strategy’s main themes, an overview map and a contents page online. It intends to have more information on the strategy available online by the end of the year.

Website: Franklin growth strategy

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Attribution: Council strategy documents, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Franklin District Council progress on growth strategy projects in the final quarter of 2006:

Published 14 January 2007


District growth strategy


The council has been preparing a district growth strategy to best manage population growth & development and it was expected to be completed in December.


Rural plan change (change 14)


The plan change seeks to manage growth in an appropriate manner in the rural & coastal areas, including rural & coastal settlements. Hearings were completed in March, recommendations presented in May & accepted by the council in June. The appeal period closed in August with 56 appeals. Their assessment is under way and the council will establish a sub-committee to progress the appeal resolution process.


Pukekohe Hill plan (change 7)


The goal of this plan change is to preserve the open-space character of the mid & upper slopes of the northern face of the Hill, while enabling development which changes land uses away from cropping on the mid slopes, and to provide for more effective stormwater management & flood control through rural, rural-residential & residential zoning. The August 2006 Environment Court decision results in a potential increase in Pukekohe urban capacity of about 500 households, located in residential & rural-residential zones.


Pukekohe North private plan change (change 21)


A private plan change request to rezone 16ha of rural land in North Pukekohe to residential, received in June 2005, was accepted by the council in August and notified on 26 September.


The notified plan change provides for greater housing choice in Pukekohe by promoting a diversity of housing types, including a more intensive development form, with a community park as a focal point.


Website: Plan change 21


Stories, 3 December 2006: Further submissions sought on Franklin change 21


1 October 2006: Pukekohe North subdivision proposal notified



Franklin business land project


The council has investigated additional land for business in Franklin and has identified areas in Paerata, Tuakau, Waiuku & Pukekohe South to be rezoned for business parks. The intention is to create new business zone provisions which incorporate urban design elements beyond what is provided in current business zones. Draft district plan provisions are being developed for each of the areas. About 300-350ha of new business land is expected to become available in this phase of the long-term business land project.


Implementation issues have arisen in the development of the plan changes, such as the delays caused by requirements by the regional council for the integrated catchment management plan to be finalised or changed, and by ARTA (the Auckland Regional Transport Authority) for transport audits and Transit NZ for wider macro- & micro-network modelling to be undertaken.


These implementation issues highlight the importance of different agencies to work co-operatively to progress matters as expeditiously as feasible, including progressing workstreams in parallel and providing clarity & consistency about processes & requirements, including resources for undertaking the work and agreed outcomes.


Economic development initiatives


Motorplex NZ: The motorsport taskforce, set up by Enterprise Franklin, is working with the council & landowners to develop a motorsport/automotive business park that encompasses a tertiary institution with business start-ups, research & development facilities and established businesses. The land identified for this project is included in the plan changes being developed through the Franklin business land project.


Economic plan: The Enterprise Franklin Development Trust is embarking on an economic plan for 2 high-growth sectors of the Franklin economy. This work will take the business land project & district growth strategy into consideration and will identify the enablers, inhibitors & drivers of growth in the sectors. The plan will also consider ways of alignment with the objectives of the Metro Project. The plan will be completed in April 2007.


Food sector: Land owners in Paerata are keen to develop a business park that supports Franklin’s food industry. Enterprise Franklin is working with the landowners to identify suitable businesses, and possibly develop a business park similar to that of Innovation Waikato.



Equine industry: The equine industry, both thoroughbred & sporthorse sectors, need to be nurtured & encouraged in Franklin. Infrastructure such as the development of bridle paths is being considered and the development of land specifically for this industry should be investigated.


Story, 5 March 2006: New regional economic forum ticks off support for sporthorse cluster despite lack of cohesion, targets, even a positive outlook



Reserves acquisition & development plan


The council is continuing work on its reserves acquisition & development plan, which will identify the district’s needs for the next 50 years. It will give the council a structure for dealing with specific reserve/open space acquisition, management & divestment decisions. It will be aligned to the district growth strategy.

Material in the related stories listed below is from the growth forum agenda, lightly edited and still presented as the council’s views.


Related stories: Consultation in March on regional sustainability framework


Auckland City Council progress on growth strategy projects in the final quarter of 2006:


Franklin District Council progress on growth strategy projects in the final quarter of 2006:


Manukau City Council progress on growth strategy projects in the final quarter of 2006:


North Shore City Council progress on growth strategy projects in the final quarter of 2006:


Papakura District Council progress on growth strategy projects in the final quarter of 2006:


Rodney District Council progress on growth strategy projects in the final quarter of 2006:


Waitakere City Council progress on growth strategy projects in the final quarter of 2006:


 


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Attribution: Forum agenda, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Update on Franklin growth strategy

Published 6 August 2006


The item below is derived from Franklin District Council’s latest report to the Regional Growth Forum.



Councils around the Auckland region report into the forum periodically on what’s happening in their neighbourhood – plans, strategies, sometimes proposals for zone changes or shifts of the urban limit.


Check the links at the foot of the page for details from other reports to the forum’s last meeting, on 5 July.


Franklin business land project, the council has investigated additional land for business in Franklin and has identified land in Paerata, Tuakau, Waiuku & Pukekohe South to be rezoned for business parks. The intention is to create new business zone provisions which incorporate urban design elements beyond what is provided in current business zones. Draft district plan provisions for each of the areas are expected to be completed in August, with notification a month later. About 350ha of new business land is expected to become available in this phase of the long-term business land project
District growth strategy, the council is preparing a strategic land use plan to manage population growth & development within the urban & rural areas. With a 50-year horizon, this project will involve identifying & managing the effects of the various economic, environmental, social & cultural ‘forces & drivers’ on land-use activities & patterns to better manage the type of growth, how much, when, where & cost of growth to the council. The strategy should be completed in October
Pukekohe Hill, plan change 7, the goal of this plan change is to preserve the open-space character of the mid & upper slopes of the northern face of the Hill through rural, rural residential & residential zoning, while enabling development which changes land uses away from cropping on the mid slopes to provide for more effective stormwater management & flood control. The plan change was appealed, with an Environment Court hearing scheduled for July. The current council position on the plan change, if put into effect, would create an additional urban capacity of about 400 households in residential & rural residential zones
Pukekohe North private plan change, the council received the request for this change, to rezone 16ha of rural land in North Pukekohe to residential, in June 2005. Council staff have been working with the applicant on design issues and the request may go to the August council meeting for a decision on whether to adopt, accept or reject
Reserves acquisition & development plan, the council has begun work on a plan that will identify the district’s needs for the next 50 years. It will be aligned to the district growth strategy
Rural plan change 14, a special council meeting decided on the recommendations in June. The plan change seeks to manage growth in an appropriate manner in the rural & coastal areas, including settlements.

Growth strategy links:



 


Update on growth strategies around the Auckland region


Update on Auckland City growth strategy


Update on Franklin growth strategy


Update on Manukau growth strategy


Update on North Shore City growth strategy


Update on Papakura growth strategy


Update on Rodney growth strategy


Update on Waitakere growth strategy


 


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Attribution: Growth forum, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Franklin sizes up business areas, prepares 50-year strategy

Published 5 January 2006


Reports to the Regional Growth Forum by the region’s 7 territorial councils outline the many changes affecting property, particularly around developing town centres. This update is derived from reports to the forum’s November 2005 meeting.



Franklin


Business land project


An engineering firm will undertake engineering assessments for possible future business areas at Pukekohe, Tuakau & Waiuku, and initial contact is being made with landowners in the possible future business area at Waiuku.


“We’ve identified 400ha – 180ha around Pukekohe, 77ha at Waiuku, 170ha at Tuakau and we’re looking at the cost of infrastructure. We’re hoping to complete zoning & engineering work by June 2006, when we will go out for notification,” Franklin District councillor Des Morrison told the forum.


Zoning for possible heavier-type industry around NZ Steel is in the early stage.


District growth strategy


The council resolved in August to prepare a comprehensive district-wide growth management strategy & spatial framework for the next 50 years, in response to urban & rural land development pressures and in recognition of the need to proactively plan to accommodate the expected population growth and the associated demand for a range of housing options, employment opportunities, retail choice, recreational & leisure facilities, entertainment and social & community-related facilities. The purpose of the project is to develop a design-led, integrated district growth strategy based on sound economic, environmental, social & cultural principles and reflecting the district’s unique character.


Pukekohe Hill appeals


Experts from both sides are continuing to refine a near-agreed position on rural-residential land, other appellants are to clarify their position in view of this and an extension of time was to be sought from the Environment Court.


Pukekohe North private plan change request


Further information has been sought from the applicant.


Urban design


The council’s urban design action plan has been sent to the Ministry for the Environment and the council has started an urban design page for its website (updated 1 January).


Website: Urban design page


 


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