Archive | Te Arai

Propbd on Q Th14Aug14 – Tranche 4 debate on, $1 reserve apartment sells, plan changes approved

Debate continues on housing areas tranche 4
4 apartments sell at auction, including one off $1 reserve
Te Arai, Drury South & Shore heritage plan changes to be made operative

2.10pm:
Debate continues on housing areas tranche 4

Auckland Council’s Auckland development committee began discussing the fourth tranche of special housing areas in confidential meeting late this morning, stopped for a late lunch and has a traffic jam of meetings to contend with this afternoon.

The budget committee is scheduled to meet at 2.30pm, with business including a refinement of local board funding policy, followed by a governing body meeting to rectify an error in the process to set the rates.

The committee recommendation on the special housing areas will remain confidential through the governing body meeting on 28 August and on until the housing minister releases a decision on the council recommendation.

4 apartments sell at auction, including one off $1 reserve

A developer-owned apartment off Symonds St, offered with a reserve price of $1 + gst, sold at Ray White City Apartments’ auction today for $100,000 + gst.

It was one of 4 units to sell under the hammer out of 5 offered at the auction. Bidding was heavy, even for the unit passed in. Auction results:

Ascent, 149 Nelson St, unit 121, sold for $280,000, sales agent Tim Warmington
Citta, 184 Symonds St, unit 319, sold for $282,000, Keisha Gutierrez
Lighter Quay, 79 Halsey St, unit 104, leasehold, passed in at $340,000, Adele Keane & Krister Samuel
The Quadrant, 10 Waterloo Quadrant, unit 2008, sold for $346,700, Damian Piggin & Daniel Horrobin
Columbia, 15 Whitaker Place, unit 10G, sold for $100,000 + gst, Donald Gibbs

Te Arai, Drury South & Shore heritage plan changes to be made operative

Auckland Council’s Auckland development committee approved 3 plan changes to be made operative today. They were:

10 Te Arai, Rodney private plan change 166, the Environment Court granted consents on 29 April to establish a golfcourse, with some amendments to be made before they and the plan change would be finalised, and that was done on 26 July

11 Drury South, Papakura & Franklin private plan changes 12 & 38, regional policy statement change 19 and regional plan: Air, land & water change 3, the proposal by Stevenson Group Ltd rezones 361ha of rural & quarry land for a mix of industrial & business development; also approved through the same hearing was Auckland Council’s proposed extension of the metropolitan urban limit to incorporate the Drury South development site & some surrounding land

12 North Shore plan change 38, amendments to schedule of historic heritage places, the plan change adds 69 buildings to the schedule, 11 category A & 58 category B

Attribution: Council committee, auction.

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US financier buys top end of Te Arai forest for golfcourse

Published 17 October 2012

Lower Northland hapu Te Uri o Hau has negotiated the sale of 230ha of the Northern Mangawhai forest at Te Arai (top left of pictire) for a golfcourse, price undisclosed.

Los Angeles financier & golf enthusiast Ric Kayne & his wife Suzanne have bought the land. Trees have already been felled to enable earthworks for a links golfcourse designed by Tom Doak, who designed the Cape Kidnappers course in Hawke’s Bay.

Mr Kayne is chairman & founder of Kayne Anderspon Capital Advisors LP, which manages alternative investment strategies and has over $US13 billion under management. He also founded Kayne Anderson Rudnick, a traditional investment management firm which he grew to over $US10 billion in assets under management before selling it in 2001.

The Kaynes will finance the construction of a championship-standard private 18-hole links course & associated facilities. The purchase has Overseas Investment Office approval, subject to a number of conditions. These include extensive replanting of the area and establishment of a trust to help fund increased surveillance & protection for nesting shorebirds in the adjoining dunes & beach area.

Te Uri owns 616ha at the northern end of Te Arai Beach, up to the Mangawhai estuary, and had been trying to develop an exclusive residential project in partnership with Queenstown-based developer John Darby through the Te Arai Coastal Lands Trust.

Te Uri acquired the land as a commercial asset as part of its Treaty of Waitangi settlement in 2002. It hopes to continue with development of the remaining area of forest to include a 45-lot development (no building visible from the beach), recreational facilities & possible coastal reserve.

Te Uri estimated that developing the course initially would add $5.9 million to the local economy and subsequently contribute about $3.5 million/year, partly through increasing tourism to the area as golfers are drawn to the new course.

Earlier stories:

8 November 2011: Te Arai plan change 166 notified

19 September 2011: Te Arai private plan change goes forward: How your councillors think about it

16 September 2011: Council approves 4 plan changes & Stonefields masterplan update, keeps suffrage memorial in place, to notify Te Arai plan change

17 June 2011: Campaigners ask council to buy Te Arai development site

10 July 2009: Council endorses commissioners rejection of big Te Arai scheme

6 August 2008: ARC buys eco park 50ha at Te Arai

28 July 2008: 77ha Te Arai rural-residential subdivision proposed

18 July 2008: Te Arai hearing set back

4 July 2008: Peart argues for development no-go areas on coast

1 April 2008: Te Arai tourist lodge development gets consent

20 July 2007: Te Arai plan change notified

1 May 2007: Petitioners seek ARC support to stop Te Arai development

15 April 2007: Te Arai village proposal to go to public consultation

11 August 2005: ARC wants to look at Darby’s Te Arai concept

Want to comment? Go to the forum.

 

Attribution: Te Uri release, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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Te Arai plan change 166 notified

Published 8 November 2011

Jurisdiction: Auckland Council

 

Neighbourhood: Te Arai

 

Applicant: Te Arai Coastal Lands Trust, a partnership between the Te Uri o Hau hapu and development partner John Darby

 

Application detail: Private plan change 166, new site-specific clauses in district plan chapter 14, scheduled activities, for Mangawhai North forest

 

Notification date: 3 November

 

Submission closure date: Monday 19 December

 

Other details: The new clause would allow creation of 44 rural-residential lots of 1-2ha & 2 larger balance lots, and the vesting of 172ha for public reserve & protection of a wetland. The plan change documentation sets out a defined location for the future reserve and the rural-residential lots. Erection of dwellings would still require resource consent.

A second new restricted-activity clause would require native species to be planted when the pine trees along the coastal margin are felled.

The Auckland Council’s regional development & operations committee accepted the private plan change for 616ha at Te Arai, at the north-eastern extremity of the region, for notification after a long debate in September.

Earlier stories:

19 September 2011: Te Arai private plan change goes forward: How your councillors think about it

16 September 2011: Council approves 4 plan changes & Stonefields masterplan update, keeps suffrage memorial in place, to notify Te Arai plan change

17 June 2011: Campaigners ask council to buy Te Arai development site

10 July 2009: Council endorses commissioners rejection of big Te Arai scheme

6 August 2008: ARC buys eco park 50ha at Te Arai

28 July 2008: 77ha Te Arai rural-residential subdivision proposed

18 July 2008: Te Arai hearing set back

4 July 2008: Peart argues for development no-go areas on coast

1 April 2008: Te Arai tourist lodge development gets consent

20 July 2007: Te Arai plan change notified

1 May 2007: Petitioners seek ARC support to stop Te Arai development

15 April 2007: Te Arai village proposal to go to public consultation

11 August 2005: ARC wants to look at Darby’s Te Arai concept

Want to comment? Go to the forum.

 

Attribution: Council notice, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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Te Arai private plan change goes forward: How your councillors think about it

Published 19 September 2011

The Auckland Council’s regional development & operations committee voted after a long debate on Thursday to accept a private plan change for 616ha at Te Arai, at the north-eastern extremity of the region, for notification.

Much of the debate was about what councillors would prefer for the land rather than the specific topic: whether to adopt the proposal as a council plan change, accept it as a private change for notification, process it as a resource consent application or reject it.

The vote was 13-4 to accept the plan for notification, the majority including the 2 Maori Independent Statutory Board members of the committee, Patience Te Ao & Wayne Knox.

The argument against allowing any development at Te Arai has been similar to that over Long Bay & Okura, at the northern extremity of the old North Shore City, and over the southern end of Pakiri Beach – pristine & should not be despoiled. In addition at Te Arai, the dunes are a nesting place for New Zealand’s rarest bird, the fairy tern, which is close to extinction with only 6 breeding pairs and 42 birds in all.

Against the desire of some councillors to prevent any development, the majority went for process, which meant only one course: allowing the private plan change for 46 dwellings to go to a hearing.

Council staff said the same number of houses could be built as of right on the property, currently the North Mangawhai forest. What landowner the Te Uri o Hau hapu and development partner John Darby, through the Te Arai Coastal Lands Trust, have proposed is a clustering of 44 homes, plus 2 larger lots, and the handover of 172ha of reserve, linking with 50ha the Auckland Regional Council bought in 2008.

Campaigners for the preservation of Te Arai asked the Auckland Council in June to buy the Te Uri property, which the hapu secured in a Treaty of Waitangi settlement. The council has discussed purchase, and some councillors advocated not allowing the plan change to proceed during last week’s debate, but shied off further discussion of council options after mayor Len Brown reminded the committee of his commitment to follow process and warned against disclosing what options the council might pursue.

The last of these warnings was simple: disclosure bumps the price up.

Mr Brown told the committee one of the new council’s first meetings was about how it dealt with process, “that we actually try & maintain a firm line so the broader community can rely on us being firm & clear in our management of that process.

“I am increasingly reviewing my views on private plan change applications and how we deal with it, but that’s an argument for another day, not around this table but with Parliament. As we go through our spatial plan & unitary plan, my view is the unitary plan needs to have an outcomes-based approach and how this (accords) with a proliferation of private plan change applications.”

Mr Brown could see no grounds for the committee to reject this plan change: “We need to receive it as we’re required to do, for no better reason than we should not (reject it). And there should be no comment round this chamber because we… I would not like to see us compromised by people disclosing what we might or might not want to do. We might be a very interested party.

“It’s well known in the commercial sector that council is a really good buyer to have in the market and there’s a premium. Move forward with an application we have to deal with and a potential land transaction that we all potentially have an interest in.”

Under the original development proposal, more than 1400 homes could have been built. The number has been progressively reduced, to 180 when Rodney commissioners rejected the plan change in 2009.

The council’s manager of operative plans, Warren Maclennan, said: “This site already has the potential capacity to provide for 46 lots under the operative plan. What the process will be looking at is whether the same capacity can be achieved in a different way, through vesting rather than planting.

“We looked at the regional policy statement & settlement provisions (to prevent development). 46 residential lots doesn’t meet any definition of an urban settlement and there are provisions around the landscape character, but that is what the plan change process would test. It’s not the same in intensity as the previous plan change.”

But the debate began with criticism of a deal reached 3 days before the end of the old council regime last year – an agreement signed on 29 October by Rodney District Council mayor, now Auckland councillor, Penny Webster for the council to agree not to invoke the clause preventing the developers from seeking a new plan change within 2 years of having a similar one rejected. In return, the developers agreed to withdraw High Court judicial review proceedings and an Environment Court appeal. The developers have carried out their side of the deal.

Former Rodney councillor Wayne Walker, also elected to the new council, said he hadn’t been aware of this agreement: “As a councillor, I was not party to this shonky deal.”

Cllr Sandra Coney said: “A Forest & Bird Society email said the heads of agreement Rodney District Council signed about 2 days before they went out of business was not legal because they (the society) were an affected party and were not notified about this.”

However, the council’s manager of litigation & regulatory legal services, Brigid McDonald, said: “This isn’t a situation of a waiver under the Resource Management Act, it’s a separate agreement between the council & Te Arai Coastal Lands and there seems a pretty clear delegation for that to be made.”

Cllr Coney: “It seems to me the heads of agreement can be put aside and we have the discretion to take it into account.”

Ms McDonald: “For the council to renege on doing that there’s a risk to this council.”

Cllr Cathy Casey: “This is a political body and we have every right to challenge it. I would like to see us own it. I am not accepting this at all. We spent up to $100 million on Monte Cecilia Park, and here we have pristine native bush…”

Cllr Webster: “This is not pristine native bush.”

Cllr Walker: “In terms of rejecting this plan change, we can use section 5 of the RMA. The independent commissioners said the Te Arai coastline is unique on the coastline of the region. Fairy terns for safeguarding… given the information we have from the independent commissioners and other case law, for example the Waimauku private plan change was rejected, is it not conceivable that we do have some grounds, perhaps substantial grounds to reject it?”

Ms McDonald: “’Not in accord with sound management practice’ is a very high threshold to meet. I would suggest balance the RMA as a whole and the applicant’s right to expect reasonable use of its land.”

Cllr Walker: “It’s inconsistent with part 5.”

Cllr Coney looked at the whole process for private plan changes and concluded that it was being dealt with in the wrong order: “One of the things I like about the law is it tries to be logical. But I believe what we’re being asked to do is here is quite illogical & perverse.

“It hangs off the Rodney district plan, which allows an applicant to give reserve in exchange for subdivision… We haven’t made a decision as to whether we would accept that vested land or not. If we accept the plan change, are we embarking on a whole process and at the end of it say no, we don’t want to accept it (the land)?

“We’re putting the cart before the horse. We might be putting the council – and applicant and people who have opposed development at Te Arai – to a lot of (unnecessary) expense, because at that point the whole thing could fall over.”

Ms McDonald: “It’s important the council takes this as a 2-step process. For it to be relied on in any way, the vesting would need to have occurred. It could be this council, a future council, that (vested land) could sit in the district plan for some future time, but it’s important this council considers the vesting option.”

Cllr Casey, who wanted to reject the plan change, not just vote against accepting it for notification, said: “What this has shown for me is a great big gap in our Auckland spatial plan, our endangered species. There’s nobody speaking up today for the fairy tern. I am going to be on the fairy terns’ case now that I know about them. There’s only 42 of these birds left in New Zealand, 6 breeding pairs, and fencing is not good enough for me and banning dogs is not good enough. I don’t think this is a great plan change, it’s not one I’m going to support.”

Cllr Mike Lee added: “I’m going to vote against. In the end we do have a democratic right to represent the people of Auckland when it comes to these matters. I have a number of concerns and will take the mayor’s advice on board and not air those concerns right now. Safeguarding the terns is a matter of grave concern, of international concern indeed – any development, to start a development 1km from a breeding site is irresponsible.

“Given the narrow vision of the Resource Management Act by the officers, I’m going to look at the broader considerations under section 5, part 6, for all of those grounds I’m going to be voting no.”

Cllr Coney: “Looking at the process, I can see ample grounds under section 5 to reject the plan change. I don’t know why they’d give you the ability to reject a plan change if you never exercised it. We are going about this in a completely illogical order of events. We should have dealt with the other matters first and then moved on.”

Ms Te Ao supported accepting the plan change for the reasons the mayor gave, then added, on councillors’ concerns about wildlife: “The most important thing in this world is people.” Cllr Lee: “Not money?” Ms Te Ao, ignoring the interjection: “Those things about wildlife can be dealt with through the process.”

Cllr Walker: “I don’t have much confidence in process, I’m going to be voting against this.”

Cllr George Wood: “I hope councillors will support this because, if we don’t, it’s really the basis of what we’re doing, we’ve got to follow the rule of law and process this in a proper manner. I would ask councilors to follow the rule of law, follow the RMA.”

Earlier stories:

16 September 2011: Council approves 4 plan changes & Stonefields masterplan update, keeps suffrage memorial in place, to notify Te Arai plan change

17 June 2011: Campaigners ask council to buy Te Arai development site

10 July 2009: Council endorses commissioners rejection of big Te Arai scheme

6 August 2008: ARC buys eco park 50ha at Te Arai

28 July 2008: 77ha Te Arai rural-residential subdivision proposed

18 July 2008: Te Arai hearing set back

4 July 2008: Peart argues for development no-go areas on coast

1 April 2008: Te Arai tourist lodge development gets consent

20 July 2007: Te Arai plan change notified

1 May 2007: Petitioners seek ARC support to stop Te Arai development

15 April 2007: Te Arai village proposal to go to public consultation

11 August 2005: ARC wants to look at Darby’s Te Arai concept

Want to comment? Go to the forum.

 

Attribution: Council meeting & agenda, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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Campaigners ask council to buy Te Arai development site

Published 17 June 2011

Campaigners for the preservation of Te Arai, on the east coast in the extreme north-east of the Auckland region, told councillors yesterday the Auckland Council would have strong funding support to buy the Te Arai Coastal Land Trust’s proposed 616ha development site.

Chris Wild, of the Te Arai Beach Preservation Society, told the council’s regional development & operations committee the council could expect contributions from society members and from the Department of Conservation if it decided to buy the coastal strip, between Mangawhai & Pakiri.

Failing that, Ms Wild said, the society wanted the council to refrain from making decisions regarding the extent of the Te Arai regional park until designations of no-go for development were decided under the Auckland Plan, which is being worked on now. The council wants to publish a draft plan in August so the final plan can be adopted by the end of this year.

Councillors asked few questions of the campaigners during the committee’s open meeting. They had a proposal to extend the regional park before them yesterday, but it was discussed behind closed doors.

Queenstown-based waterfront development specialist John Darby teamed up with the landowner, the Kaipara-based Te Uri o Hau hapu, for a proposal that initially – 6 years ago – was for a subdivision of several hundred houses in the Carter Holt Harvey Ltd forest property immediately south of Mangawhai.

In 2009, commissioners appointed by the Rodney District Council rejected the reduced development proposal of 180 dwellings on part of the 616ha property, which has a coastline of more than 5km. The district council endorsed the commissioners’ decision but it’s been appealed to the Environment Court.

Apart from its popularity as an isolated surf beach, Te Arai is the breeding ground for New Zealand’s most endangered bird, the fairy tern.

Ms Wild said housing should be set back a minimum 500m from the beach, but the society believed a setback of at least 1km was advisable to protect the terns & sand dunes and retain the beach’s rare isolated feel.

Earlier stories:

10 July 2009: Council endorses commissioners rejection of big Te Arai scheme

6 August 2008: ARC buys eco park 50ha at Te Arai

28 July 2008: 77ha Te Arai rural-residential subdivision proposed

18 July 2008: Te Arai hearing set back

4 July 2008: Peart argues for development no-go areas on coast

1 April 2008: Te Arai tourist lodge development gets consent

20 July 2007: Te Arai plan change notified

1 May 2007: Petitioners seek ARC support to stop Te Arai development

15 April 2007: Te Arai village proposal to go to public consultation

11 August 2005: ARC wants to look at Darby’s Te Arai concept

Want to comment? Go to the forum.

 

Attribution: Council committee meeting, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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Council endorses commissioners rejection of big Te Arai scheme

Published 10 July 2009

John Darby’s ambitious proposal for a masterplanned development at Te Arai, just south of Mangawhai on the east coast north of Auckland, has been rejected by commissioners.

 

The Rodney District Council endorsed that rejection at its meeting on 2 July.

 

Queenstown-based waterfront development specialist Mr Darby teamed up with the landowner, te Kaipara-based Te Uri o Hau hapu, for a proposal that included 180 dwellings on part of 616ha property which has a coastline of more than 5km.

 

I’ll examine the commissioners’ decision over the weekend.

 

Earlier stories:

6 August 2008: ARC buys eco park 50ha at Te Arai

28 July 2008: 77ha Te Arai rural-residential subdivision proposed

18 July 2008: Te Arai hearing set back

4 July 2008: Peart argues for development no-go areas on coast

1 April 2008: Te Arai tourist lodge development gets consent

20 July 2007: Te Arai plan change notified

1 May 2007: Petitioners seek ARC support to stop Te Arai development

15 April 2007: Te Arai village proposal to go to public consultation

11 August 2005: ARC wants to look at Darby’s Te Arai concept

 

Want to comment? Go to the forum.

 

Attribution: Council, commissioners’ decision, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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ARC buys eco park 50ha at Te Arai

Published 5 August 2008

The Auckland Regional Council has bought the 50ha Eyres Eco Park site at Te Arai Pt, at the north-eastern corner of the region, for $4.751 million in a tender 5 years after the eco-tourism company began attempts to get resource consent.

 

(Photo shows the purchase area, aerial view looking south toward Pakiri).

 

The council approved the purchase in a closed meeting today, then sent out a press release expounding on the value of the property. I tend to discount the post-event verbiage if public officials aren’t prepared to explain openly why they should buy something before they buy it. It’s part of being public, which outweighs confidentiality on policy.

 

The regional council said it would consider managing the property as parkland through a regional park management plan process. This would include consultation with iwi, the district council & the public.

 

Eyres Eco Park Ltd (Brian Wadman, Orakei) got consent in March allowing 7 eco-tourist lodges. The site at 698 Te Arai Pt Rd, sits next to the Rodney District Council’s Te Arai Pt recreational reserve and overlooks the Mangawhai Beach to the north & Pakiri Beach to the south. The area is starting to be opened up, including a proposal by coastal development specialist John Darby to develop up to 850 homes on the Carter Holt forest strip north of Te Arai Pt Rd.

 

Eyres Eco Park got consent for its lodges, each of about 300m², after agreeing to protect 32.8ha identified in the district council’s proposed district plan as significant natural area, by protecting Te Arai Pt Lake & associated wetland with an area of 4000m² and by vesting 13.2ha containing Little Shag Lake & 4 wetland areas.

 

The district council rejected Eyres Eco Park’s original application for 9 lodges in 2003, but the Environment Court gave an interim decision in December 2004 indicating it would grant consent only if the proposal was significantly modified.

 

Regional council chairman Mike Lee said after today’s decision: “The land holds high ecological, cultural, heritage, recreational & scenic values. Highly sensitive dune lake ecosystems, wetlands, coastal broadleaf forest & regenerating forest cover the majority of the land.

 

“Securing this property for parkland guarantees the protection of a sensitive headland, which overlooks a significant section of coastline and contains some of the region’s most outstanding scenic & ecological features.

 

“This is an outstanding piece of land overlooking a superb beach and one of the longest (23km) & most scenic beach systems on the east coast of New Zealand. The ARC is in a race against time to secure & protect our coastal landscape for present & future generations of New Zealanders.

 

As well as the important natural features of this land, Te Arai o Tahuhu, or Te Arai Pt, is recognised as a landmark of significant spiritual, cultural & historical significance to tangata whenua.”

 

Regional council parks & heritage committee chairman Sandra Coney said: “The Te Arai Pt headland is recognised for its scenic values and neighbouring Te Arai & Pakiri Beaches are a popular location for recreation.

 

“It was important to protect this headland from development as, with the Rodney District Council-owned land, it is the prominent landscape feature on this long stretch of relatively untouched coast, between Mangawhai & Pakiri, and can provide visual & recreational linkages with the ARC’s existing parkland at Pakiri.”

 

Deputy parks chairman & Rodney’s representative on the regional council, Christine Rose, said: “The biodiversity values of this property are high due to the rarity of the habitat nationally & regionally, and the presence of threatened plants & animals. The land appears to have few plant pests or weeds.

 

“Our preliminary assessments have shown the presence of at least 9 nationally threatened birds, including the Australasian bittern, the grey duck & the North Island fernbird. We are also hopeful that the threatened Auckland green gecko, which is in gradual decline nationally, can be found here.”

 

Earlier stories:

28 July 2008: 77ha Te Arai rural-residential subdivision proposed

18 July 2008: Te Arai hearing set back

4 July 2008: Peart argues for development no-go areas on coast

1 April 2008: Te Arai tourist lodge development gets consent

20 July 2007: Te Arai plan change notified

1 May 2007: Petitioners seek ARC support to stop Te Arai development

15 April 2007: Te Arai village proposal to go to public consultation

11 August 2005: ARC wants to look at Darby’s Te Arai concept

 

Want to comment? Email [email protected].

 

Attribution: Council release, ARC-supplied map & photos, some comment from me, story written by Bob Dey for The Bob Dey Property Report.

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77ha Te Arai rural-residential subdivision proposed

Published 28 July 2008

Jurisdiction: Rodney District

 

Neighbourhood: Te Arai

 

Applicant: HA Pierau

 

Application detail: 662 Ocean View Rd, application to subdivide 5 existing lots totalling 77.1ha into 9 lots, of which 5 would be rural-residential ranging from 1.3-1.9ha, the others 3ha, 7.6ha, 28.8ha & 30.2ha; 15.5ha would be protected as wetland

 

Notification date: 22 July

 

Submission closure date: Friday 22 August

 

Want to comment? Email [email protected].

 

Attribution: Council notice, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Te Arai hearing set back

Published 18 July 2008

Hearing of a private plan change to enable a large beachfront development at Te Arai, on the east coast at the top of the Rodney District, has been put on hold while the applicants provide the district council with more information.

 

The hearing was to have started next week and to have run for 2½ weeks.

 

Coastal development specialist John Darby & the local hapu, Te Uri o Hau, joined forces to form the Te Arai Coastal Lands Trust for the project on land currently occupied by a Carter Holt Harvey Ltd forest immediately south of Mangawhai.

 

Mr Darby proposes developing 650 homes in a forest environment, an 18-hole golf course, bridle trails, a resort hotel & conference facility, 200 homes in a village setting and shops, restaurants, a health spa, swimming pool & tennis courts.

 

The council has not supported the project, which would partially urbanise one of the last undeveloped stretched of the east coast between downtown Auckland & Whangarei.

 

The development area covers 616ha and stretches along 5.3ha of beach between Te Arai Pt & Mangawhai Harbour. Buildings would cover only 5% of the whole site, which has a current zoning of special character area under Rodney’s 1993 district plan and landscape protection rural zone under the council’s 2000 plan.

 

To rezone the site for the proposed comprehensive development, the Te Arai trust requires a private plan change for the 1993 zoning and a variation to the 2000 zoning. A report by planning consultant Barry Kaye for the independent hearing commissioners recommends the plan change be declined and the variation be withdrawn.

 

Earlier stories:

20 July 2007: Te Arai plan change notified

1 May 2007: Petitioners seek ARC support to stop Te Arai development

15 April 2007: Te Arai village proposal to go to public consultation

11 August 2005: ARC wants to look at Darby’s Te Arai concept

 

Want to comment? Email [email protected].

 

Attribution: Council notice, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Te Arai tourist lodge development gets consent

Published 1 April 2008

The Environment Court has given final consent to a tourist lodge development at Te Arai Pt, accommodating up top 56 people, more than 3 years after a highly conditional interim decision.

 

Eyres Eco Park Ltd (Brian Wadman, Orakei) intends to develop 7 one-storey lodges, each of about 300m², on a 50ha site between Te Arai Pt Rd & Ocean View Rd, a short distance back from the rocky outcrop that divides Pakiri Beach and the remaining strip of beach running up to the Mangawhai Estuary at the top of the Rodney District’s east coast.

 

The development would also have a 12ha reserve.

 

A separate development is proposed for the forest strip between Te Arai & Mangawhai by the Te Arai Coastal Lands Trust (formerly the Te Uri o Hau & NZ Land Trust joint venture) , which has a proposal for development of up to 850 homes – most in a forest environment, others in a new resort village. That development would also have a golfcourse, bridle trails and a resort hotel.

 

Environment Judge Laurie Newhook & Commissioner Ross Dunlop gave an interim decision in December 2004 on the Eco Lodge application, indicating they would grant consent only if the proposal was significantly modified. However, they also reversed, in part, Rodney District Council’s refusal of subdivision & land use consents.

 

Judge Newhook said the court concluded in 2004 that the application wasn’t without merit, but other district & regional consent applications relating to the proposal still had to be made. Since then, points of law have been argued in the High Court & Court of Appeal.

 

After the Court of Appeal sent one part of the application, on existing use rights, back to the Environment Court, the whole application went to a conference in court and to mediation. Judge Newhook issued the final Environment Court decision, with consent from the council, on 19 March.

 

Earlier stories:

20 July 2007: Te Arai plan change notified

1 May 2007: Petitioners seek ARC support to stop Te Arai development

15 April 2007: Te Arai village proposal to go to public consultation

11 August 2005: ARC wants to look at Darby’s Te Arai concept

 

Want to comment? Email [email protected].

 

Attribution: Court decision, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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