Archive | Long Bay

Long Bay gets a centre, and regional park will get a new entrance

It’s called The Village, it puts in place a plan going back 17 years, it will be accompanied by at least one & possibly several new entries to the country’s busiest beachside park.

It will provide what the notion of hasty carpetlaying of landscapes with unmitigated housing subdivisions doesn’t: a natural community centre.

And it will have, within & on the fringe, some intensive housing (apartments pictured, above retail).

Todd Property Group Ltd launches its $70 million Village at Long Bay apartment, retail & dining destination today.

It’s a short step – about 200m – back from the expanded Long Bay Regional Park, which was created by the former Auckland Regional Authority in 1965, added to by the former Auckland Regional Council & North Shore City Council and, over the last decade, extended through public acquisitions of what was to have been development land.

Development battle goes back to 1995, and beyond

The development area down Glenvar Ridge Rd.

The Environment Court ruled in 1995 that the metropolitan urban limit should be shifted to include Long Bay but not Okura, to the north on the other side of the Okura Estuary. The North Shore City Council released a concept plan for Long Bay in 2000, followed by a structure plan in 2001.

In the early days of the Long Bay subdivision development, the placing of intensive housing was a point of combat. Council planners wanted it immediately behind the regional park boundary, where a line of private baches had sat for decades. The developer whom Todd replaced in 2008, Greg Olliver of Landco Ltd, thought that was insane and told me of the North Shore council plan: “Their structure plan has Otehas on the ridge behind the beach.”

Public planners also took their ideas on where the town centre should be to council hearings – an extension of the council concept plan & structure plan intentions of preventing ecological damage into the very different dimension of telling a developer how to develop.

The public planners posted their town centre on a ridgeline slightly further north than where Mr Olliver, and now Todd, wanted it.

The Village is where developers wanted it

Artist’s rendering of the Village’s façade towards the sea.

Instead, after many hearings, the Village, with its services & apartment residents as well as shops and food & beverage outlets, will be perched where the developers wanted it, just above the Vaughan Stream that winds down the hill, and on its southern side. Preparations are underway for more housing, both standalone & terraces, up the northern slope from the stream toward Vaughans Rd, which led down to the original 1860s farm & homestead of the Vaughan family that were the original components of the regional park.

The Long Bay subdivision has 450 houses built in the first 7 years of development, and Todd envisages it will add about 1700 over the next 8 years. That in itself will be a community, alongside the existing Long Bay College. The food & beverage element of the Village will target park & beach visitors who arrive via the new Glenvar Ridge Rd entrance to the park.

The 1.6ha centre has been designed by Architectus and will feature courtyards & about 28 businesses, including restaurants, a medical centre, a chemist, a supermarket, gym & retail outlets. Their views seaward will be over wetlands & extensive new planting.

The upper floors of 2 of the 5 Village buildings will contain 26 premium apartments, a mix of one- & 2-bedroom units with views over the park to the Hauraki Gulf. Construction has just begun on site, and Todd expects to have the seaside village completed in 2019.

Key to a transformation

The Long Bay subdivision stages.

Evan Davies, Todd Property managing director.

For Todd Property managing director Evan Davies, this gateway is a transformation in keeping with the standard of integrated public & private landscapes throughout the subdivision. “For the first time, visitors to the Long Bay Regional Park are going to be able to walk from the beach to fantastic new shops & eateries in just a minute or 2,” he said.

“This is going to be a premium village centre that we think the people of Long Bay are going to be really proud of. It’s going be a vibrant place for the community to come together, on the edge of a beautiful natural landscape.”

The key to it is the new route to the park down Glenvar Ridge Rd, scheduled for completion in 2019. At the moment, residents have 2 access roads from the existing Torbay street network and the park entrance is at the southern end of the beach. The new 1km stretch of Glenvar Ridge Rd will be a more direct route from the Northern Motorway, down the ridgeline from upper Glenvar Rd to the Village and on to the park. The road is supported by extensive geotechnical engineering works, including 770m of underground piling up to 15m in depth.

“It will have a cycle lane & footpaths and will transform the entry experience for people coming into Long Bay, for all modes of travel,” Mr Davies said.

Earlier stories:
16 February 2015: Todd hands 19ha at Long Bay to council
28 September 2010: Council swan song adds 38ha to Long Bay public space
7 December 2009: Councils add $7 million to Long Bay purchase bills
18 July 2008: Court side more with council than Landco over Long Bay
18 July 2008: Todd ousts Olliver from Landco
26 July 2007: Olliver says council plan for Long Bay “a recipe for disaster”
26 July 2007: Landco savages council over Long Bay
2 April 2007: Great Park Society gets new talks under way
17 October 2006: Lee tells deputation he’ll urge planners: “Go to the edge of the law to protect Long Bay backdrop”
14 July 2006: Landco & Great Park Society both lodge Long Bay structure plan appeals
27 April 2006: Councillors vote to notify Long Bay structure plan
21 April 2006: Commissioners reject Landco’s version for Long Bay
16 May 2002: Regional council gets Long Bay deal
21 December 2001: Arbitration agreed for city council’s Long Bay reserve target
7 October 2001: Long Bay reserve designation & structure plan notified
29 August 2001: Councils start designation process to acquire 44ha at Long Bay
Shore councillors slow Long Bay infrastructure process
Buyer pricks council’s Long Bay euphoria bubble
2001: Shore councillors tell developers who’s boss (in theory)
15 October 2000: Long Bay concept plan released
[Many articles written before 2004 are incorrectly dated 2 March 2004, the result of a website design change; I’ve changed some of the references here].

Attribution: Company release, interview.

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Todd hands 19ha at Long Bay to council

Todd Property Group Ltd has transferred 19ha adjoining the Long Bay Regional Park to Auckland Council as part of an agreement to ensure public access to the headland.

The land has Maori & European heritage sites and creates a buffer between Todd’s residential development and the regional park. The transfer boosts the regional park to nearly 200ha.

With the additional land, Long Bay Regional Park will now be nearly 200 hectares.

Todd Property managing director Evan Davies said: “The handing over of this land reflects our long-term commitment to preserving the unique heritage & natural environment at Long Bay, which also includes the creation of an additional 13 parks & reserves and an extensive wetland network within our nearby residential development.”

Attribution: Council release.

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Council swan song adds 38ha to Long Bay public space

Published 28 September 2010

North Shore City Council has secured another 18.7ha for parkland above the beach at Long Bay in a deal worth about $35 million.

On top of that, it’s secured 13 reserves covering a total 4.65ha in the Long Bay structure plan area plus 14.8ha of stormwater & esplanade reserve areas, which mayor Andrew Williams said would take the total value to about $50 million.

The council has acquired all 38.2ha from Todd Property Group Ltd as reserve & development contributions, taking land in lieu of cash contributions. Since the first acquisition above the 110ha regional park in 2001, the city & regional councils & Okura Great Park Society have acquired 87.4ha from Todd & its predecessor, Landco Ltd.

Mr Williams said yesterday the existing council had pushed through the agreement last week to ensure it was done before the reins of local government were handed over to the new Auckland Council, because authority to deal with the land could be dispersed among the new council and various council-controlled organisations, which might have decided that for their own purposes parts of the transaction shouldn’t be completed.

Todd was the prime financier of Greg Olliver’s Landco Ltd and its numerous subsidiaries and took control of the group in 2008. Todd Property is a subsidiary of the Todd family’s Todd Capital Ltd.

The agreement signed last week followed a second interim decision of the Environment Court on the Long Bay structure plan, made on 16 September but kept secret because of the negotiations over the contributions deal.

Mr Williams made that deal public yesterday because it had been signed off by Todd Property, although it still needed approval of the Todd board at a meeting this week. It’s also dependent on Auckland Transition Agency approval.

Since Landco acquired 198ha above the regional park at Long Bay from the Robinson family in 2000, the amount available for its residential subdivision has been steadily whittled down. Against the Landco intention of a masterplanned subdivision, the Okura Great Park Society fought 10 years ago for a 400ha park incorporating the Landco property, the regional park below it and the farmland above it, and continued fighting for more parkland as both the regional & city councils took pieces and the structure plan allowing residential subdivision was put in place.

The city council’s first bite was 38.5ha above the Okura rivermouth, in 2001. At the same time, the regional council added 5.8ha to the Long Bay Regional Park, including 2.4ha along the beachfront where Mr Olliver had envisaged replacing the old baches with multi-million-dollar homes.

After arbitration, the city council agreed in 2002 to pay $22.475 million for its 38.5ha. In 2003, arbitration increased the price of the first regional council acquisition to $7.9 million.

Last December, the regional council said it would contribute $2 million, and the city council $5 million, to the Great Park Society’s purchase of 4.77ha from Todd.

Yesterday, Mr Williams said: “In essence, what we will secure into public ownership for the city will be:

Public ownership of the heritage protection area 18.7ha which borders & protects the Long Bay Regional ParkPublic ownership of another 13 reserves in the Long Bay structure plan area totalling 4.65ha, ranging from 617m² up to 10,838m². Most of these 13 reserves are in the range of 2000-3500m², including strategically placed parks with extensive vistas out to the Hauraki Gulf. The largest of these, the 10,838m² reserve number 3, runs up the ridge from the heritage protection area towards Long Bay College, and will in effect create a wonderful continuation of the heritage protection area to link up to the Beach Rd extension at the top of the ridgeIn addition, under public ownership there are a further 14.8ha of stormwater & esplanade reserve areas in the Awaruku Stream & Vaughan Flats catchment areas, which essentially become public land/open recreation spaces. Council will be providing a lovely walking/cycling track down the side of the Awaruku Steam catchment area to link up to the property we own at 19 Glenvar Rd, thereby making a very pleasant connection for those existing homes in that Torbay area (Awaruku Valley) down to the regional park. Likewise, there will be walking trails down the side of Vaughans Flats in the future.

"We are continuing negotiations for the 2 existing houses within the heritage protection area and are hopeful that, in conjunction with the Auckland Regional Council, we may be able to also include these properties in the overall agreement. But that may take some time and may be a task for the future local board/Auckland Council if we run out of time before 31 October, the last day for North Shore City."

The second interim decision of the Environment Court determines outstanding matters arising out of the first interim decision in 16 July 2008. The council said, in a release: “Overall, the court has adopted the council’s vision for the Long Bay area.  In particular, the court confirmed a high level of protection for public views from the regional park & Grannys Bay catchment, back towards the areas of urban development. The court also made a number of findings on the appropriate use of the heritage protection area.

“The council & Landco had agreed a number of amendments to ensure that the plan change could be implemented in a timely & realistic manner. The majority of these have been confirmed by the court.”

Earlier stories:

7 December 2009: Councils add $7 million to Long Bay purchase bills

18 July 2008: Court side more with council than Landco over Long Bay

18 July 2008: Todd ousts Olliver from Landco

U: The names behind the action, the week to 13 July 2008, part 4, Receivers at Pheonix Trust, Todd rep replaces Olliver on several Landco boards

26 July 2007: Olliver says council plan for Long Bay “a recipe for disaster”

26 July 2007: Landco savages council over Long Bay

17 October 2006: Lee tells deputation he’ll urge planners: “Go to the edge of the law to protect Long Bay backdrop”

21 April 2006: Commissioners reject Landco’s version for Long Bay

16 May 2002: Regional council gets Long Bay deal

21 December 2001: Arbitration agreed for city council’s Long Bay reserve target

7 October 2001: Long Bay reserve designation & structure plan notified

29 August 2001: Councils start designation process to acquire 44ha at Long Bay

15 October 2000: Long Bay concept plan released

 

Want to comment? Go to the forum.

 

Attribution: Council release, judgment, phone interview, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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Councils add $7 million to Long Bay purchase bills

Published 7 December 2009

The Auckland Regional Council said last week it would contribute $2 million “toward protecting Long Bay Regional Park from the impact of development”.

 

The money is to support the Okura Great Park Society’s purchase of 4.77ha from Todd Properties Ltd (ex-Landco), known as area D, near the Long Bay Regional Park.

 

The regional council’s parks & heritage committee voted on 2 December to make the contribution, provided the society forms a trust to own the land. North Shore City Council has also made a conditional $5 million contribution.

 

Regional parks committee chairman Sandra Coney said the regional council’s desire to protect the backdrop behind Long Bay Regional Park “has been a priority since the first parkland was purchased (by the Auckland Regional Authority) in 1965 and it has continued to successfully fight against the impact of development.

 

“The ARC has been influential in the creation of a 19.6ha heritage protection area that abuts the south end of the park and protects the cultural heritage values & landscape – viewed from both land & sea.”

 

After protracted negotiations with Landco, in 2004 the regional council bought 5.9ha adjoining the southern & mid-point part of the regional park for $7.7 million and North Shore City Council bought 38ha alongside the Long Bay-Okura marine reserve in the north.

 

Cllr Coney said the land adjoining the park had a long history of planning & litigation, including:

an Environment Court ruling allowing urbanisation (1996)development of a structure plan by North Shore City Council in consultation with the regional council, landowners & interested partiespetitioning by the community for the public purchase of undeveloped land for public open spacea joint offer by the regional & city councils to buy land from Landco, resulting in purchases by both councils by way of the Public Works Act, finalised in 2004an interim ruling by the Environment Court (2008) on the proposed Long Bay structure plan, resulting in the creation of a heritage protection area to protect land at the southern end of the park from development.

 

Earlier stories:

18 July 2008: Court side more with council than Landco over Long Bay

1 April 2007: Great Park Society gets new talks under way

17 October 2006: Lee tells deputation he’ll urge planners: “Go to the edge of the law to protect Long Bay backdrop”

14 July 2006: Landco & Great Park Society both lodge Long Bay structure plan appeals

26 April 2006: Councillors vote to notify Long Bay structure plan

21 April 2006: Commissioners reject Landco’s version for Long Bay

20 November 2005: Long Bay: Who knows best?

16 December 2004: Long Bay plan change draws 11,000 submissions

29 June 2003: Regional council’s Long Bay acquisition bill tops $8.5 million

19 December 2002: Shore councillors agree to pay 14.4% more for Long Bay reserve

29 August 2001: Councils start designation process to acquire 44ha at Long Bay

30 October 2000: Buyer pricks council’s Long Bay euphoria bubble

15 October 2000: Long Bay concept plan released

 

Want to comment? Go to the forum.

 

Attribution: Council release, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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Council won’t appeal Long Bay decision

Published 24 August 2008

North Shore City Council decided on 6 August not to appeal against the Environment Court’s interim decision on appeals to the Long Bay structure plan.

 

The council held a 13-minute confidential meeting, then released its decision into the public agenda.

 

What wasn’t released into the public eye was transparency.

 

Earlier story:

18 July 2008: Court side more with council than Landco over Long Bay

 

Want to comment? Click on The new BD Central Forum or email [email protected].

 

Attribution: Agenda for next council meeting, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Court side more with council than Landco over Long Bay

Published 18 July 2008

Landco Ltd has lost the battle to convince the Environment Court that its proposal to suburbanise Long Bay is better than the North Shore City Council’s less-intensive structure plan.

 

But the court has criticised both sides of the urbanisation argument and made orders requiring the council to consult with Landco & other parties to submit a draft structure plan land use strategy map by 30 November, and a final version by 31 March 2009.

 

The court – Judge Jon Jackson with commissioners Ross Dunlop & Marlene Oliver – said in the 357-page judgment released on Wednesday its decision was final in respect of its findings of fact, statement of the law, predictions & judgments as to the strategy (policies) to be followed, but interim in all other respects.

 

Judge Jackson wrote: “Landco’s case was that only its witnesses had considered all the relevant factors and given them the appropriate weight, and therefore we should be persuaded by its claimed carefully integrated case.

 

“Amongst the relevant factors it said must be assessed were its superior urban design, the earthworking budget, the yield of residences, the supermarket, greater uptake of public transport and the social benefits that would flow from all these matters.

 

“We find that there are 2 substantial problems with the Landco approach. First, none of its resource management/planning witnesses considered all the relevant plan or policy instruments, and each of them considered some irrelevant provisions (eg, chapters 9A & 17B, which the court said came after the structure plan was decided), in addition to over-emphasising those they did consider.

 

“Secondly, when the proper weight is given to all the relevant factors, some are much more important than others.”

 

The court concluded that neither structure plan proposal gave enough weight to the matters of national importance preserving various elements and that, in a comparison of the 2 plan proposals, Landco’s was “deficient”.

 

The court said Greg Olliver – ousted this week as a director & majority shareholder of Landco by his longtime backers, the Todd family – had submitted that the council plan showed a lack of vision. But, the court said, “we find that it is the Landco structure plan which fails to meet the purpose of the Resource Management Act.”

 

I need to work through the judgment more to come up with further details, over the weekend.

Earlier stories:

26 July 2007: Olliver says council plan for Long Bay “a recipe for disaster”

26 July 2007: Landco savages council over Long Bay

17 October 2006: Lee tells deputation he’ll urge planners: “Go to the edge of the law to protect Long Bay backdrop”

14 July 2006: Landco & Great Park Society both lodge Long Bay structure plan appeals

26 April 2006: Councillors vote to notify Long Bay structure plan

21 April 2006: Commissioners reject Landco’s version for Long Bay

20 November 2005: Long Bay: Who knows best?

16 December 2004: Long Bay plan change draws 11,000 submissions

29 June 2003: Regional council’s Long Bay acquisition bill tops $8.5 million

19 December 2002: Shore councillors agree to pay 14.4% more for Long Bay reserve

29 August 2001: Councils start designation process to acquire 44ha at Long Bay

17 July 2001: Landco buys Lunn Ave quarry

24 March 2001: Shore councillors tell developers who’s boss (in theory)

30 October 2000: Buyer pricks council’s Long Bay euphoria bubble

15 October 2000: Long Bay concept plan released

 

Want to comment? Email [email protected].

 

Attribution: Judgment, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Great Park Society gets new talks under way

Published 1 April 2007


North Shore mayor George Wood wants to meet the Auckland Regional Council & local MPs to see what more can be done to address the Long Bay-Okura Great Park Society’s concerns.


The council has long said it can’t afford to buy some 200ha behind the regional & council parks above the beach & cliffs from Long Bay round to the Okura estuary and up to East Coast Rd.


The Great Park Society hasn’t listened to the council’s “can’t” and sent a 150-strong deputation to the council meeting on Wednesday night, pressing for further action.


Development company Landco Ltd (Greg Olliver), meanwhile, has had land compulsorily acquired, had its proposals for design & infrastructure of the balance overturned by a council structure plan and by a hearings panel last year, and has been waiting 6 years to develop land which the Environment Court said 9 years ago should be zoned for urban use.


After Landco bought the 198ha Durafort block behind the regional park from the Robinson family in 2003, the regional council paid Landco $8 million to add 5.8ha of that land to the existing regional park and the city council paid $23.4 million for 38.5ha beside the regional park.


Not satisfied, the Great Park Society wants greater protection for the backdrop to the regional park, which now covers 116ha. Society convenor Fiona McLaughlin was joined by East Coast Bays Community Board chairman Sally Cargill in advocating greater protection, supported by representatives from all the other 5 community boards in the city.


The society called for:

stronger planning protection of natural, cultural & landscape values
protection for archaeologically significant areas
the council to ensure the marine reserve is protected, including exploring initiatives such as a stringent monitoring programme of any development and the use of compliance bonds, and
the council to buy more reserve land, including the adjoining Grannies Bay & the Awaruku ridge.

The mayor said: “We respect the society’s efforts and I was delighted to present then-convenor, the late David Gatward, with a North Shore City civic award a few years ago.


“There are many complex & costly challenges but we’re prepared to sit down and talk them through.”


Community services & parks committee chairman Margaret Miles said she supported protecting the Long Bay Park backdrop. Meanwhile the council is seeking suggestions for a new name for its 38.5ha reserve at Long Bay. Submissions close on 20 April.


Earlier stories:


17 October 2006: Lee tells deputation he’ll urge planners: “Go to the edge of the law to protect Long Bay backdrop”


14 July 2006: Landco & Great Park Society both lodge Long Bay structure plan appeals


26 April 2006: Councillors vote to notify Long Bay structure plan


21 April 2006: Commissioners reject Landco’s version for Long Bay


20 November 2005: Long Bay: Who knows best?


16 December 2004: Long Bay plan change draws 11,000 submissions


29 June 2003: Regional council’s Long Bay acquisition bill tops $8.5 million


19 December 2002: Shore councillors agree to pay 14.4% more for Long Bay reserve


29 August 2001: Councils start designation process to acquire 44ha at Long Bay


30 October 2000: Buyer pricks council’s Long Bay euphoria bubble


15 October 2000: Long Bay concept plan released


 


Want to comment? Click on The new BD Central Forum or email [email protected].


 


Attribution: Council release, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Landco & Great Park Society both lodge Long Bay structure plan appeals

Published 13 July 2006


The Long Bay-Okura Great Park Society has filed its appeal against North Shore City Council’s Long Bay structure plan and put the document on its website.



The society’s notice of appeal to the Environment Court comes a fortnight after the development company which owns most of the land, Landco Ltd (Greg Olliver), gave notice of its appeal.


The Environment Court ruled in 1995 that the metropolitan urban limit should be shifted to include Long Bay but not Okura. The city council released a concept plan for Long Bay in 2000, followed by a structure plan in 2001.


A hearings panel rejected most of Landco’s alternative structure plan proposals, pointing to heavier earthwork & geotechnical requirements for the company scheme than the council proposed.


Among points in the Great Park Society’s appeal, it opposes:


the decision to locate the proposed village centre on the flat land beside the lower Vaughan’s Stream
the limit on the extent of the proposed landscape protection areas
the decision to continue with plans for roads to cross the wetlands of Vaughan’s & Awaruku Streams connecting Beach Rd with Vaughan’s Rd
the decision to create a heritage protection zone where building is discretionary, rather than permanent heritage protection for the entire heritage landscape of Long Bay, including all individual archaeological sites.

Still steadfastly promoting its desire for the structure plan to restrict any development within about 200ha of undeveloped land adjacent to the Long Bay Regional Park so it remains available to be designated as reserve, the society said the council decision:

wouldn’t adequately recognise & provide for the preservation of the natural character of the coastal environment, wetlands or rivers & their margins and the protection of them from inappropriate subdivision, use & development, and
failed to have sufficient regard to the finite nature of undeveloped land available for recreational purposes in the Auckland region.

Landco said in its appeal the structure plan:

while “highly & inappropriately prescriptive for a structure plan”, couldn’t reasonably be implemented and wouldn’t achieve the outcomes sought
wouldn’t allow for the best environmental outcomes to be achieved, particularly in terms of geotechnical matters, ecology, landform, visual outcomes, urban design, sense of community and the relationship the Long Bay settlement would have with the regional park
wouldn’t provide for appropriate outcomes for future residents.

Landco wants the council structure plan contained in plan change 6 & variation 66 to be withdrawn and replaced by Landco’s September 2005 alternative structure plan.


Websites: Great Park Society


Landco appeal documents


 


Earlier stories:


26 April 2006: Councillors vote to notify Long Bay structure plan


21 April 2006: Commissioners reject Landco’s version for Long Bay


20 November 2005: Long Bay: Who knows best?


 


Want to comment? Click on The new BD Central Forum or email [email protected].


 


Attribution: Public notices, Great Park Society & Landco websites, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Councillors vote to notify Long Bay structure plan

Published 26 April 2006


North Shore City Council voted tonight to approve the structure plan for Long Bay for notification, with 2 abstentions and against the disapproving background of a council chamber filled with Great Park supporters.



A number of councillors expressed support for the Great Park concept but said the council couldn’t afford to buy land earmarked for conversion to urban development to create it.


They also said the process being followed meant they couldn’t oppose the structure plan, as recommended in a report by commissioners – 3 independents, including chairman Michael Savage, with mayor George Wood & Cllr Callum Blair.


Cllr Chris Darby, an advocate of smart growth as in intensification, said there was nothing smart about developing residential subdivisions south of the Long Bay ridge. He said cities needed limits, and all great cities had great parks, “even third-world cities”.


Cllr Darby also noted that case law cited by the commissioners in their conclusion “really prohibits the democratic process”. The 1967 judgment cited by the commissioners put councillors on notice that it would infringe natural justice for them to vote against the commissioners’ recommendation unless they’d heard the application & objections themselves.


Apart from supports of the Great Park, the main party affected by the structure plan is Landco Ltd (Greg Olliver), which has already had 38.5ha compulsorily acquired by the city council in 2002 for use as a reserve and 5.8ha of prime beachfront land taken by the regional council to add to the existing 110ha Long Bay Regional Park. Landco bought the 198ha Durafort block for development in 2000.


Landco spokesman George Hulbert said tonight: “In our view this decision allows urban development to progress at Long Bay. We still genuinely believe the proposals we put forward were in the best interests of Long Bay.”


The commissioners rejected most of Landco’s alternative structure plan proposals, pointing to heavier earthwork & geotechnical requirements for the company scheme. “Whatever approach is taken, there’s still a considerable amount of earthworks required,” Mr Hulbert said.


He said the company still had to analyse the commissioners’ decision before deciding on appeal.


Proponents of the Great Park did talk of appealing, although the way councillors spoke of the process it’s hard to see how an appeal based on rejecting the resource management process might succeed. A more profitable – certainly cheaper – avenue for them might be to look at farmland nearby in Rodney District which hasn’t already been earmarked for development.


The Environment Court ruled in 1995 that the metropolitan urban limit should be shifted to include Long Bay but not Okura. The city council released a concept plan for Long Bay in 2000, followed by a structure plan in 2001.


Earlier stories:


21 April 2006: Commissioners reject Landco’s version for Long Bay


20 November 2005: Long Bay: Who knows best?


12 November 2005: Long Bay hearing under way


12 May 2005: Council looks again at Great Park options


29 June 2003: Regional council’s Long Bay acquisition bill tops $8.5 million


19 December 2002: Shore councillors agree to pay 14.4% more for Long Bay reserve


7 October 2001: Long Bay reserve designation & structure plan notified


24 March 2001: Shore councillors tell developers who’s boss (in theory)


20 March 2001: Shore councillors slow Long Bay infrastructure process


30 October 2000: Buyer pricks council’s Long Bay euphoria bubble


15 October 2000: Long Bay concept plan released


 


Want to comment? Click on The new BD Central Forum or email [email protected].


 


Attribution: Council agenda, meeting, own files, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Commissioners reject Landco’s version for Long Bay

Published 21 April 2006


The last of the 27 recommendations by commissioners on the Long Bay structure plan is the most important: Rejection of Landco’s alternative structure plan.



The commissioners’ recommendations have been released in the agenda for the North Shore City Council meeting next Wednesday, 26 April.


The staff recommendation accompanying the commissioners’ report is that their decision be adopted by the council and the plan change & variation be publicly notified.


5 commissioners heard submissions last November on the Long Bay structure plan, stage 2 (officially, proposed variation 66 & plan change 6). The hearing was chaired by independent commissioner Michael Savage, with mayor George Wood, northern ward councillor Callum Blair and independents Jenny Hudson & Roger Mills.


The key competing interests at Long Bay have been:

a proposal by Landco Ltd (Greg Olliver) to develop a subdivision on land it owns
council desires to shape the area and
a public campaign for a 200-400ha Great Park, starting at the regional park above the beach at Long Bay, incorporating areas bought from Landco by the Auckland Regional Council & the city council, and also incorporating the remaining Landco development area.

Preparation of the structure plan began after the Environment Court determined in 1996 that the MUL – the metropolitan urban limits, defined in the regional policy statement – would include an area from Glenvar Rd to the boundary between Long Bay & the Okura catchment.


The court ruled that the Okura area would remain rural and that, in principle, the Long Bay area was suitable for urban development. In the city’s partly operative district plan, the Long Bay land is zoned residential expansion.


Landco bought the 198ha Durafort block behind the 110ha Long Bay Regional Park in 2000, but the regional council subsequently compulsorily acquired 5.8ha of prime beachfront land to expand the park and the city council acquired 38.5ha.


Among disagreements over the plan area, Landco wanted to shift the urban village to the northern slope to link better with access roads, wanted some changes to density areas and differed on ecological measures required. Landco produced its own structure plan proposal at the hearing to achieve its aims.


Key commissioner recommendations (numbers 12-19):

The village centre (Long Bay 5 zone) should be relocated to the south side of Vaughans Stream in conjunction with an area of Long Bay 4 zone (urban village zone) adjacent to the village centre (which is in line with Landco’s proposal)
The access to the northern entrance to the regional park should be relocated to the south of Vaughans Stream
The existing Long Bay 4 zone (urban village) should be extended to include the area previously occupied by the village centre on the north side of the stream and to incorporate some of the landscape protection (enhancement) area to the north
The maximum height limit of the Long Bay 4 zone (urban village) should be reduced from 18m to 12.5m
The maximum height limit of the Long Bay 5 zone (village centre) should be set at 12.5m instead of 10m & 12m
Provision should be made for higher-density housing, both terraced (as provided for in the Long Bay 3, urban neighbourhood zone) & apartment-type housing (as provided for in the Long Bay 4, urban village zone) in the Long Bay 4 zone to the north of the Vaughans Stream only
The pattern of densities and mix of densities and estimated overall yield of housing in the Structure Plan area should be retained, and
The Long Bay 2B zone (1000m² suburban neighbourhood) next to Vaughans Rd should be retained.

The commissioners acknowledged the strong community support for retaining land behind the regional park and for the creation of a Great Park, and for the high value placed on the landscape that forms the backdrop to the regional park. “However, it is not appropriate to rezone private land for a great park, particularly in the absence of present council funding for the acquisition of that land. Nor is it appropriate to defer decisions on the Long Bay structure plan,” they said.



Website: North Shore City Council 26 April agenda


 


Earlier stories:


20 November 2005: Long Bay: Who knows best?


12 November 2005: Long Bay hearing under way


12 May 2005: Council looks again at Great Park options


29 June 2003: Regional council’s Long Bay acquisition bill tops $8.5 million


19 December 2002: Shore councillors agree to pay 14.4% more for Long Bay reserve


7 October 2001: Long Bay reserve designation & structure plan notified


24 March 2001: Shore councillors tell developers who’s boss (in theory)


20 March 2001: Shore councillors slow Long Bay infrastructure process


30 October 2000: Buyer pricks council’s Long Bay euphoria bubble


15 October 2000: Long Bay concept plan released


 


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Attribution: Council agenda, own files, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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