Archive | Eastern corridor

Consents to be lodged in April for eastern busway

Auckland Transport said on Friday it was finalising design plans for the Panmure-Pakuranga busway design, which would provide quicker, more frequent & more reliable bus services for Auckland’s eastern suburbs.

The transport agency is holding public information days & neighbourhood meetings this week and expect to lodge consent applications in late April.

Auckland Transport Ameti (Auckland-Manukau eastern transport initiative) programme director Peter King said the key project was the Panmure Station-Pakuranga Town Centre section of the south-eastern busway. Construction was likely to start in 2017, for the busway to open by 2021.

Auckland Transport is aiming to open the full busway to Botany by 2024, 4 years earlier than previously planned, and extend bus lanes to Highland Park.

The Panmure-Pakuranga projects include:

  • Replacing Panmure roundabout with an intersection, with traffic lights & more direct pedestrian crossings
  • Panmure-Pakuranga busway on lanes separate from traffic congestion
  • Panmure-Pakuranga cycle & footpaths separate from traffic
  • Second Panmure Bridge for busway & shared cycle/footpath.

“Large numbers of new passengers will be attracted by buses travelling on congestion-free lanes every 5-10 minutes between Panmure & Pakuranga.

“Buses currently get caught in the same congestion as cars, meaning people have limited choice. Providing a quicker, frequent & more reliable option is expected to shift large numbers out of cars to ease pressure on the roads for journeys that can’t be made by public transport.

“The recent experience with the new Panmure Station & electric trains shows significant growth comes with higher quality public transport

“Another major feature is separated cycle & footpaths, which will make it possible to cycle between Panmure, Pakuranga, and on to Farm Cove & Pigeon Mountain by connecting with the Rotary Walkway along the coast.”

Links: Ameti
Ameti You Tube video

Attribution: Auckland Transport release.

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Brownlee commits to more Ameti & East-West Link work

The new Ellerslie-Panmure Highway bridge, opened yesterday, was a significant milestone for Ameti (the Auckland-Manukau eastern transport initiative), Transport Minister Gerry Brownlee said.

The minister said it broadened transport options and freed up roads in an area with some of New Zealand’s highest traffic flows & resulting congestion: “Combining Ameti with an East-West Link is the Government’s next major focus for the Auckland transport network.

“The suburbs of Onehunga, Mt Wellington & East Tamaki are home to a number of industrial & logistics businesses that make a critical contribution to Auckland & the national economy. Businesses in this area already employ around the same number of people as workers in Auckland’s cbd, and there is considerable potential for many more jobs.

“Together, Ameti & the East-West Link have the potential to unlock the economic potential of this important part of Auckland.

“I have asked the NZ Transport Agency to work with Auckland Transport and report back to me about which elements of Ameti & the East-West Link should be brought forward with additional funding. This work will be completed in December, and I expect that the Government will make funding decisions in the first quarter of 2014.”

Attribution: Ministerial release.

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Council notifies first phase of Ameti construction

Published 30 May 2012

Jurisdiction: Auckland Council

Neighbourhood: Panmure

Applicant: Auckland Transport

Application detail: Ameti (Auckland-Manukau eastern transport initiative) – Panmure – phase 1, Mt Wellington Highway-Morrin Rd, plan change 323, notice of requirement for a designation and applications for resource consents

Notification date: 30 May

Submission closure date: Thursday 12 July

Other details: The application lists properties subject to the requirement, which is to enable construction of the new Ameti road corridor and upgrade of existing roads in the Tamaki area.

Earlier stories:

4 April 2008: Preliminary Ameti spending hits $44 million

7 March 2008: Manukau councillors make momentous changes to growth plans

27 July 2007: 2 councils approve Ameti, Action Hobson loses attempt to cancel northern road designation

18 March 2007: Auckland committee endorses $1.5 billion Ameti package for eastern suburbs

30 May 2006: Simpson loses bid to clean motorway out of eastern designation

Simpson loses bid to clean motorway out of eastern designation (long version)

19 November 2004: Manukau looks on forlornly as Auckland ditches eastern highway

26 August 2004: Sending $1 billion east would be worse than a $3 billion pipedream

25 August 2004: Cut-rate eastern corridor would cost $1.1-1.4 billion – and deliver a worse performance

4 August 2004: Council to extend eastern corridor designation

20 March 2004: Eastern transport corridor: My first batch of questions

20 March 2004: Eastern transport corridor: Putting it in context

15 March 2004: Eastern transport corridor reports about a lot more than roads

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Attribution: Company release, story written by Bob Dey for the Bob Dey Property Report.

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Preliminary Ameti spending hits $44 million

Published 3 April 2008

Spending on Ameti (the Auckland Manukau eastern transport initiative) will rise to $44.1 million after Auckland City Council’s transport committee today endorsed a new memorandum of understanding.

 

The whole project had a $1.5 billion estimate on it a year ago.

 

The council’s partners – Manukau City Council, ARTA (the Auckland Regional Transport Authority) & Land Transport NZ – have already approved the new memorandum, which will take Land Transport spending to $24.3 million. The next spend is to complete the notice of requirement & assessment of environmental effects for the entire project.

 

While Land Transport NZ is spending more on the project, the Manukau City Council voted on 6 March to cut from $5 million to $3 million the money it would spend buying houses along the Ameti route this year, even though council transport group manager Chris Freke said there were willing buyers for 30 houses worth $14 million and the whole acquisition exercise could cost $60 million.

 

Auckland City Council roads manager Matthew Rednall said in his report the LTNZ spending was subject to a number of conditions which would be progressed through the next round of design & investigation.

 

Earlier stories:

7 March 2008: Manukau councillors make momentous changes to growth plans

27 July 2007: 2 councils approve Ameti, Action Hobson loses attempt to cancel northern road designation

18 March 2007: Auckland committee endorses $1.5 billion Ameti package for eastern suburbs

 

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Attribution: Council committee meeting & agenda, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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2 councils approve Ameti, Action Hobson loses attempt to cancel northern road designation

Published 27 July 2007

Auckland City Council approved the Ameti project last night – the replacement for the previous council’s eastern transport corridor, minus the section from St Johns through Hobson Bay – 2 days after the Manukau City Council gave its approval to the scheme.

 

After eastern corridor champion John Banks lost the mayoralty in 2004 and 2 Action Hobson councillors, Richard Simpson & Christine Caughey, took Hobson ward seats, the multi-billion-dollar corridor scheme & its motorway were replaced by the Auckland Manukau eastern transport initiative.

 

The replacement included many of the features of the former scheme within Auckland City’s far eastern suburbs (the Tamaki area), although they were revised.

 

Cllr Caughey failed in a move to include a 4-part amendment that would have taken out the opportunity for a major road through the Hobson part of the corridor, losing the vote on that by 10-7 and bringing on the open rancour of Citizens & Ratepayers councillors for her effort.

 

She had failed in a similar move at the transport & urban linkages committee’s meeting last Friday.

 

The Action Hobson councillors said that while the opportunity for the motorway remained, uncertainty would affect areas the corridor passed through, particularly the Orakei headland. Cllr Caughey wanted council staff to report back on this aspect to the transport committee’s September meeting, but retiring deputy mayor Bruce Hucker said there would no chance of getting action on it before the October local body elections.

 

Tamaki councillor Bill Christian said Ameti had nothing to do with any road north of the Merton Rd-St Johns Rd intersection, while Cllr Simpson commented: “Council has unwittingly signed a Faustian pact by keeping that designation there. We should be using it for far more effective purposes.”

 

Cllr Linda Leighton (CitRat) said it was important for the council to think about the future, “and for that reason we shouldn’t remove any designation”.

 

Cllr Scott Milne (CitRat leader) said: “When you have a one-issue party with the support base dissolved, you have the pumping of the phoenix which will not rise. There is no motorway designation across Hobson Bay. There is actually no motorway designation in the eastern corridor. There is a road designation in the eastern corridor and what you are talking about is removing that road.”

 

Into the future, he said, it might be used for more rail – “It might be a hover track, it might be levitation, who knows in 20 years’ time. It is certainly dangerous to remove a transport designation when we don’t know the future.”

 

Cllr Milne said councillors expressed concern at a pre-meeting briefing about where traffic at the northern end of Ameti would go, and staff were to report back on that. “It is dangerous, also, to think that rail provides the single solution for our transport woes. It was clearly pointed out that for the next interim period, say 10-15 years, our transport base will be by road. That is not to say it will be so in 30 years. In the meantime we have to allow a better road system.”

 

The proposal recommended by the transport committee is now projected to cost $1.3 billion over 15 years and includes:

 

reducing the footprint for Mt Wellington Highway while allowing for bus lanes, service lanes and walking & cycling improvementsreplacing the underpass at the Mt Wellington Highway & Waipuna Rd intersection with a new local street running beside the rail corridor, reducing the width of Mt Wellington Highwayincluding a cover over the new street & rail corridor at Panmure rail station, between Ellerslie-Panmure Highway & Mountain Rdaccess to the new Sylvia Park rail station and improvements to the intersection of Carbine Rd & the South Eastern Highway (SEART) provided by grade separation, in this case a bridgeno widening of Carbine Rd between SEART & Waipuna Rd, andmaintaining existing access to Ireland Rd from Waipuna Rd. 

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Attribution: Council agenda & meeting, council release, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Auckland committee endorses $1.5 billion Ameti package for eastern suburbs

Published 18 March 2007


Auckland City Council’s transport & urban linkages committee endorsed the $1.5 billion Ameti proposal for the eastern suburbs on Wednesday.


The Manukau City Council’s transport committee will make its decision on the proposal next month.


The Ameti proposal will go before the full Auckland council for approval on Thursday 22 March.


Ameti – the Auckland-Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative – replaced the eastern transport corridor of the previous Auckland City Council, which got various costings but no payment plan.


The previous Auckland council majority was defeated partly as a result of the election of 2 anti-corridor Action Hobson councillors, Richard Simpson & Christine Caughey, in the Hobson ward in 2004. Both first-term councillors have played significant roles and Cllr Simpson has been chairman of the transport & urban linkages committee, and thus in charge of its change in direction.


That committee has agreed with the Ameti proposal that recommends a package of transport solutions to unlock the economic potential for what Cllr Simpson said was the fastest-growing area of Auckland. Ameti proposes a step change in passenger transport investment, improved walking &cycling connections as well as new & enhanced arterial roads.


Cllr Simpson said: “The city’s eastern suburbs are poised for significant growth over the next 20 years. We need to plan & deliver a package of transport solutions to give people living & working in the city’s eastern suburbs more travel choices.


“Ameti is critical to satisfying the council’s commitments to the regional growth strategy and supports the Auckland Regional Transport Authority’s plans for passenger transport.


“Once delivered, passenger transport use will increase by 400%, 30,000 cars will be removed from the Panmure roundabout and 11,000 people will find it easier to walk & cycle during the morning peak.”


Cllr Simpson said consultation with the community was likely to begin in April, once Ameti’s project partners, the 2 city councils & ARTA’s board, have approved the proposal.


Earlier stories:


25 June 2006: Auckland agrees to $1.8 million of design work for Manukau links


30 May 2006: Simpson loses bid to clean motorway out of eastern designation


21 May 2006: Transport committee to consider eastern suburbs traffic plans


13 July 2005: Eastern route study resumes as far east population set to escalate


 


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Attribution: Council release, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Auckland agrees to $1.8 million of design work for Manukau links

Published 25 June 2006


Auckland City Council agreed on Thursday to proceed with $1.8 million (its share) of intensive design work to improve transport links between Glen Innes & Manukau.



It’s part of the Ameti programme which replaced the eastern transport corridor of the previous council term. Ameti is the Auckland-Manukau eastern transport initiative and it’s a partnership between the Auckland & Manukau city councils & ARTA – the Auckland Regional Transport Authority). In the previous council term, outsiders like the regional council were excluded.


One of the 2 Tamaki Edge arterial road improvement projects will focus on the area between State Highway 1 & Glen Innes, via Mt Wellington, and the other will define the best route for improved transport between Panmure (in Auckland City) & Pakuranga (across the Tamaki River in Manukau City).


Richard Simpson, chairman of the Auckland City Council’s transport & urban linkages committee, said the design work would provide certainty for people and heralded the beginning of developing transport alternatives in Auckland’s eastern suburbs.


“Glen Innes, Panmure, Mt Wellington & Sylvia Park are areas that are growing. To benefit from this growth, better access & connections are vital. This means more transport infrastructure offering people more choice.


“There is planned (& under way) public & private investment of around $3 billion in the Tamaki Edge area, including the development of the Mt Wellington quarry & Sylvia Park and the university’s expansion of its Tamaki campus. We need to design & implement appropriate, sustainable transport initiatives to cater for this growth and unlock the area’s economic potential.


“Public transport, walking, cycling & improved roading are crucial to enable sustainable growth and provide access in this area of the city. These 2 design projects will deliver this. This council’s focus is on creating transport hubs offering people more travel choice.”


While Cllr Simpson says that, as an Action Hobson councillor he faces hostility at every opportunity from Citizens & Ratepayers Now, which lost its council majority over continuing support for a multi-billion-dollar eastern corridor scheme and still displays preference for a grander roadway into the city.


Cllr Simpson said: “Providing transport infrastructure with quality urban design outcomes is fundamental to the design of the 2 design projects. By improving both transport & urban design, the council aims to make connections between people & places. We cannot afford consideration of transport infrastructure that does not add to the design & character of the Tamaki Edge area.


“We will be ensuring that quality urban design elements are woven into these 2 design projects.”


Earlier stories:


30 May 2006: Simpson loses bid to clean motorway out of eastern designation


21 May 2006: Transport committee to consider eastern suburbs traffic plans


13 July 2005: Eastern route study resumes as far east population set to escalate


 


Want to comment? Click on The new BD Central Forum or email [email protected].


 


Attribution: Council release, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Simpson loses bid to clean motorway out of eastern designation

Published 29 May 2006


Action Hobson councillor Richard Simpson, chairman of Auckland City Council’s transport & urban linkages committee, tried to lock the eastern motorway permanently out of eastern suburbs infrastructure thinking tonight. He lost.



While only one councillor, Bill Christian from the Tamaki ward, still professed hope that this motorway would be built, others weren’t prepared to irrevocably cancel any option. Not, at least, before some imminent research & design scoping is carried out.


Cllr Simpson elaborated on staff proposals for preliminary design work, putting more of the detail into his own recommendation to the committee and including support for public transport, travel demand management and bike & pedestrian access to public transport nodes.


Then he added clauses for investigation aimed at excluding motorway use from the corridor designation north of Glen Innes (through to downtown Auckland)


Cllr Simpson also set a timetable for these investigations – one report by August, another by next February.


But Bruce Hucker, City Vision councillor, deputy mayor & the architect of the council’s direction in this term, moved an amendment taking the recommendations back to those of the staff, dealing with contractual arrangements up to $1.2 million for design work on the northern section of Ameti (the Auckland Manukau eastern transport initiative, which replaced the previous council’s eastern transport corridor a year ago) and a combined Auckland-Manukau $1 million on route definition between Panmure & Pakuranga, in the Ameti central section.


Cllr Hucker’s amendment was carried 7-5 and that’s the recommendation that will go the full council when it meets on Thursday 22 June.


Longer version of this story: Simpson loses bid to clean motorway out of eastern designation (long version)


 


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Attribution: Council agenda, meeting, story written by Bob Dey for this website.


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Simpson loses bid to clean motorway out of eastern designation (long version)

Published 29 May 2006


Action Hobson councillor Richard Simpson, chairman of Auckland City Council’s transport & urban linkages committee, tried to lock the eastern motorway permanently out of eastern suburbs infrastructure thinking tonight. He lost.



While only one councillor, Bill Christian from the Tamaki ward, still professed hope that this motorway would be built, others weren’t prepared to irrevocably cancel any option. Not, at least, before some imminent research & design scoping is carried out.


Cllr Simpson elaborated on staff proposals for preliminary design work, putting more of the detail into his own recommendation to the committee and including support for public transport, travel demand management and bike & pedestrian access to public transport nodes.


Then he added clauses for investigation aimed at excluding motorway use from the corridor designation north of Glen Innes (through to downtown Auckland)


Cllr Simpson also set a timetable for these investigations – one report by August, another by next February.


Hucker sides with staff designation support


But Bruce Hucker, City Vision councillor, deputy mayor & the architect of the council’s direction in this term, moved an amendment taking the recommendations back to those of the staff, dealing with contractual arrangements up to $1.2 million for design work on the northern section of Ameti (the Auckland Manukau eastern transport initiative, which replaced the previous council’s eastern transport corridor a year ago) and a combined Auckland-Manukau $1 million on route definition between Panmure & Pakuranga, in the Ameti central section.


Cllr Hucker’s amendment was carried 7-5 and that’s the recommendation that will go the full council when it meets on Thursday 22 June.


Arta & Manukau express alarm


The Auckland council’s staff, and the joint Ameti steering group, clearly wanted the corridor designations retained until investigations were completed.


Arta (the Auckland Regional Transport Authority) was alarmed. Chief executive Alan Thompson wrote to the city council last week saying land in the corridor might be needed for expanded freight & passenger rail services.


Manukau City Council’s new chief executive, Leigh Auton, also expressed alarm in a letter sent to his Auckland counterpart today: “It is clear from the work that our councils & Arta are undertaking together on the Ameti project that transport solutions for the medium to long term are still to be determined….. At the very least the designations should be retained until further investigations as to their potential to accommodate further transport improvements are completed.”


Cllr Hucker & Citizens & Ratepayers Now leader Scott Milne both tried to undermine Cllr Simpson’s efforts by suggesting he’d headed off on a tangent of his own. “What I detect is, there was no discussion (before Cllr Simpson wrote his recommendations) with anybody who knows what we want to do on this council,” Cllr Milne said. But Cllr Simpson was quick with his response: “I’ve had 2 briefings with officers and also discussions with other people who have expertise in this matter.”


Cllr Milne said Cllr Simpson’s recommendations were “the worst sort of zealotry” and Cllr Simpson had also not realised that if the committee agreed to them that would invoke a round of regional consultation because they were in conflict with the regional land transport policy statement.


“Sad day” says Simpson


After the meeting, Cllr Simpson rejected my suggestion that if he’d phrased his recommendations differently, focusing on getting the project under way in a manner to his liking and leaving aside mention of the motorway, he might have won support: “I think we phrased it perfectly. So it’s a really sad day,” he said.


He said the corridor was “being treated like an emergency valve. We’ve got to say the future of Auckland is about public transport.” He was disappointed his idea of breaking the issues into 3 – the design work, the designation (or changing thereof) north of Tainui Rd, from Panmure to the cbd, and outcomes from tightening the designation – had been killed off. “They’re the things that we’re trying to move the city forward on,” he said.


For Cllr Simpson, the proposed improvements to existing arterials (widening Mt Wellington Highway, the blue line on the photo) and proposed new arterial route through to Glen Innes (the dotted red line) are the start of what could still be a grand motorway if the motorway designation isn’t cancelled. “It’s car-centric. It’s going to be the ruin of this city.”


The end point in Glen Innes is some distance from the suburb of 8000 people being built in the former Lunn Avenue quarry, and that new housing would be some distance from both shops & a railway station.


Planning manager says designation should stay


The council’s acting group manager, transport planning, Allen Bufton, said the regional transport authority was identifying & evaluating public transport & travel demand management options and draft plans should be available in the next month. He said the designation should be maintained so those options weren’t foreclosed.


Mr Bufton said the committee had previously recognised the need to investigate local roading improvements for the business, university & residential developments which could see Tamaki get 30,000 more residents & 10,000 jobs by 2015.


Without better access, that growth isn’t being welcomed by everybody. The Eastern Bays community board agreed in April to tell the council it didn’t support further rezoning in the Lunn Avenue quarry “until such time as a full transport plan has been developed & consulted on, which also addresses the issue of substantial developer contributions to subsidise public transport.”


And Citizens & Ratepayers Now councillor Doug Armstrong put the proposition: “Those developments shouldn’t take place until a proper transport solution is worked out….. Existing residents are starting to realise these developments are going to ruin the quality of life in their ward. We think (my grouping), things like the quarry development should not go ahead until we’ve got a solution. We have not got a solution. There are safety issues, fumes issues…..”


Fellow Citizens & Ratepayers Eastern ward councillor Toni Millar said moving the Auckland Netball courts to the Merton Rd end of the quarry site had worsened eastern suburbs congestion, and not just on Saturdays – 5pm games midweek were a cause of increased congestion.


At the same time, she said, one opportunity to reduce congestion was being blocked: “Kiwi Income has money for a railway station at Sylvia Park. Transit & Arta don’t want to give them permission. You’re going to have 2000 people working at Sylvia Park using their cars, not public transport. That is stupidity.”


Sylvia Park fronts Mt Wellington Highway, and Mr Bufton said the proposal for widening that road wouldn’t entail the usual cribbing of a couple of metres, almost into residents’ bedrooms: “We’re looking at a boulevard approach. We take enough land to create a living environment. The people who remain will have a decent standard of living.”


Mr Bufton made 2 other points about congestion, cost & speed, one of them about Arta’s TravelWise programme, which was “aimed at reducing car use but not mobility” and had reduced Auckland car travel by 1.18 million km/year. Over one-third of children attending TravelWise schools walked or biked to get there, and 62,600 employees & students in Auckland were involved in travel plans. But, he said, “there’s been almost no uptake in the Ameti area”.


Perhaps ironically given the time it’s taken to make very little progress so far, after a $3-4 billion proposal (with no funding lines specified) was ditched following the change in council majority in 2004, Mr Bufton said the council didn’t intend to seek a Land Transport NZ subsidy for its preliminary design work because the work was ready to start and a funding application would delay it for 4-6 months.


However, despite that seeming irony, despite the defeat of Cllr Simpson’s timelined proposal and despite the defeat of a motion from Cllr Milne acknowledging growth factors and seeking a report on their effects by August, transport general manager Stephen Rainbow said a timeline of future council engagement could be produced for councillors in July.


The programme, including consultation, wouldn’t start until the detailed design work was done, but would highlight for the public when things are going to happen.


Earlier stories:


Shorter version of this story: Simpson loses bid to clean motorway out of eastern designation


21 May 2006: Transport committee to consider eastern suburbs traffic plans


18 September 2005: Hucker paper outlines transport vision


13 July 2005: Chance to flay the soul-less developer


13 July 2005: Eastern route study resumes as far east population set to escalate


28 June 2005: Council allows business subdivision to proceed after study finds road from quarry to Lunn Ave intersection doesn’t work


17 December 2004: Councillors agree to retain corridor designations


12 December 2004: Councillors want details of no-highway eastern corridor back on table in April


19 November 2004: Action Hobson councillors have powerful transport & urban form roles


19 November 2004: Manukau looks on forlornly as Auckland ditches eastern highway


5 September 2004: Court grants partial order allowing Landco to start quarry development


27 August 2004: Modified corridor option worse for Glen Innes rejuvenation


26 August 2004: Sending $1 billion east would be worse than a $3 billion pipedream


25 August 2004: Cut-rate eastern corridor would cost $1.1-1.4 billion – and deliver a worse performance


4 August 2004: Council to extend eastern corridor designation


30 June 2004: Councillors agree with scaled-back eastern corridor


12 May 2004: Tunnel out as preferred eastern corridor unveiled


9 May 2004: Deloitte says tolls can’t be sole eastern corridor solution


20 March 2004: Eastern transport corridor: My first batch of questions


20 March 2004: Eastern transport corridor: Putting it in context


15 March 2004: Eastern transport corridor reports about a lot more than roads


13 November 2000: Council rejects private quarry zone change


 


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Attribution: Council agenda, meeting, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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Transport committee to consider eastern suburbs traffic plans

Published 21 May 2006


Auckland City Council’s transport & urban linkages committee will hold an exotraordinary meeting Monday 29 May to9 consider 2 design projects for eastern suburbs traffic which will cost the council $1.8 million.


The council has published an item saying the transport meeting will consider 2 Ameti design projects (Ameti is the Auckland-Manukau eastern transport initiative, the name & project which replaced the previous council’s eastern corridor, and it’s a partnership between the Auckland & Manukau city councils & ARTA – the Auckland Regional Transport Authority).


The first project will scope arterial road upgrades between State Highway 1 & Glen Innes, via Mt Wellington


In the second project, the 2 councils will work together to define the best route for improved links between Panmure & Pakuranga.


The combined design cost of the proposed projects to Auckland City would be around $1.8 million.


The Auckland transport committee is headed by Cllr Richard Simpson, elected under the Action Hobson banner in opposition to the previous Citizens & Ratepayers Now-dominated council’s proposals for a multi-billion-dollar eastern transport corridor.


The weekend council statement said Ameti was “the result of a complete rescoping of original transport plans for the city’s eastern suburbs. It puts greater emphasis on public transport, travel demand management & local arterial road improvements.


“The Tamaki Edge area is undergoing significant growth and is expected to have an additional 30,000 residents & 10,000 jobs by 2015. Auckland City is working to provide sustainable transport solutions to support a successful & prosperous city, with more travel choices for people living or working in the city. If the committee supports the proposed design projects, a recommendation will be made to the full council.”


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Attribution: Council statement, story written by Bob Dey for this website.

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